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  1. Boris Tatarenko's Avatar
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    #1

    The son's the spit

    Hello.
    Does the following sentence make sense?
    The son's the spit and image of his father.

    Do you use a word "spit" this way?
    Thanks.
    Please, correct all my mistakes. I should know English perfectly and if you show me my mistakes I will achieve my dream a little bit faster. A lot of thanks.

    Not a teacher nor a native speaker.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: The son's the spit

    Yes, but it's the not the sort of expectorant spit. A lot of speakers nowadays hear "spit 'n' image" as "spitting image", and many dictionaries use that phrase.

    I guess it might refer to use of saliva in magic, unless it's a different sort of spit entirely.


    PS Bingo: http://grammarist.com/usage/spitting-image/
    Last edited by BobK; 11-May-2014 at 12:11. Reason: Added PS

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: The son's the spit

    I would have said "spitting image."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: The son's the spit

    I imagine there must have been English teachers who would tear their hair out when they heard "spitting image"!

  5. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: The son's the spit

    Those English teachers are mostly retired at this point. The more modern version seems to have taken hold in the 1950s.

    See Ngram here.

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