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  1. Junior Member
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    #1

    Do not interrupt when adults are talking.

    Do not interrupt when adults are talking.
    Do not interject when adults are talking.

    Can we use interject to instead of interrupt?

  2. Moderator
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    #2

    Re: Do not interrupt when adults are talking.

    No. 'Interject' is transitive and needs a direct object.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Do not interrupt when adults are talking.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    No. 'Interject' is transitive and needs a direct object.
    How do you feel about these examples?
    Examples of INTERJECT
    1 . “That's an interesting idea,” he interjected, “but I don't think you've considered all of the details.”
    3 . If I may interject, I have things I'd like to add.
    http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/interject


  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Do not interrupt when adults are talking.

    The difference to me is with "interrupt" (in this context) you expect the child to butt in with something unrelated. "Can I have a cookie?" "Where's my baseball glove?"
    With "interject" you mean the child should not butt in with a statement or his or her opinion on what's being discussed.

    However, this is likely a personal difference and others may see both words being used interchangeably.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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