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    #1

    subject of this sentence

    In America and Britain, the unemployment has fallen far faster over the past year than the trivial recoveries in both countries seem to justify.

    What is the subject of this sentence?

    In my opinion, the subject is "In America and Britain, .................in both countries" , and "seem" is the verb. Am I correct?

    thanks for your help

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: subject of this sentence

    No. "In America and Britain" is a prepositional phrase; so is "in both countries". The sentence has two clauses connected by a conjunction. The subject of the first clause is "(the) unemployment" and the verb is "has fallen". The subject of the second clause is "(the trivial) recoveries" and the verb is "seem".

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    #3

    Re: subject of this sentence

    thank you very much and one more question, the conjunction "than " here means what?

    Generally, "than" has the meaning of "comparison",right?

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: subject of this sentence

    Yes, it is part of "faster than".

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    #5

    Re: subject of this sentence

    thanks a lot and I know the comparison between “A is faster than B'.here. However, I can't get the meaning of this sentence.
    The two parts of this sentence seem paradoxical. Would you like to rewrite this sentence?

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    #6

    Re: subject of this sentence

    They are paradoxical. Normally when unemployment falls substantially, a strong economic recovery ensues. In this case, the recoveries were not very strong. My guess is the answer to the paradox is the way governments report unemployment statistics. In the US, when people are very discouraged about finding a job, they stop looking. At that point, the government no longer considers them "unemployed". Completely ridiculous.

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    #7

    Re: subject of this sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by Katherine Gan View Post
    In America and Britain, the unemployment has fallen far faster over the past year than the trivial recoveries in both countries seem to justify.

    What is the subject of this sentence?

    In my opinion, the subject is "In America and Britain, .................in both countries" , and "seem" is the verb. Am I correct?

    thanks for your help
    The subject of the sentence is "unemployment". The preceding "the" should be omitted. Even though the sentence has two clauses, it has only one subject.
    In the sentence 'I am taller than he is.', "I" is the subject.

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    #8

    Re: subject of this sentence

    "Unemployment" is the subject of both clauses? What does one do with "the trivial recoveries seem to justify"?

    In your example there are also two subjects. I am taller than he is (tall). The subjects are "I" and "he".

    I know more than he knows. Two subjects.

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    #9

    Re: subject of this sentence

    You might need to read 2006's post again, Mike. He doesn't say that 'unemployment' is the subject of both clauses; He says that 'unemployment' is the subject of the sentence. In fact, I'm merely repeating what he seems to have made quite clear, so it's probably best that you read his post again.
    Are you claiming that the number of subjects of a sentence has to be the same as the number of subjects of clauses in the sentence?

  6. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: subject of this sentence

    Yes, perhaps I misinterpreted what he said. However, when there are two clauses in a sentence, there are two subjects in that sentence. One could make the case that the first subject is THE subject, however.

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