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    #1

    > Greater than / > More than

    Hi!

    For the mathematical symbol >, should we use the phrase "greater than" or "more than"?

    E.g.: This container has more/greater water than that one.


    Thanks!

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: > Greater than / > More than

    It would make no sense to say "greater water".

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    #3

    Re: > Greater than / > More than

    The mathematical symbol means 'is greater than', with reference to numerical values.

    We don't use it in a sentence about two containers of water.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: > Greater than / > More than

    You can write "Amount of water in Cup A > Amount of water in Cup B". But you'd need an appropriate context to write that.
    There is more water in A than B, but '>' doesn't mean "more than". The amounts can be greater or lesser, but the water can't be.

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    #5

    Re: > Greater than / > More than

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    You can write "Amount of water in Cup A > Amount of water in Cup B". But you'd need an appropriate context to write that.
    There is more water in A than B, but '>' doesn't mean "more than". The amounts can be greater or lesser, but the water can't be.
    E.g.: "There is greater quantity of water in container A than in container B." >> Is this right?

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: > Greater than / > More than

    There is a​ greater quantity of water in A than [in] B.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: > Greater than / > More than

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    ... '>' doesn't mean "more than"...
    Strictly. But with our lives increasingly dominated by computers and smartphones, and the growing usage of keyboard-based abbreviations, more and more people are behaving as if it were.
    b

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