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    #1

    123K and 12.3K

    Is 123K = 123000
    Is 12.3K = 12300

    Thanks

  1. Ali Hsn's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: 123K and 12.3K

    Hello.

    *I AM NOT A NATIVE OR TEACHER.*

    Yes, if by "K" you mean "Kilo".
    Some other examples: 1 KW=1000 watts; 1 KG=1000 grams; and so on.
    Last edited by Ali Hsn; 21-May-2014 at 18:02. Reason: I deleted a typo. Thanks NDQuattro. Yes, in computer science 1 KB equals 1024 bytes.

  2. NDQuattro's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: 123K and 12.3K

    yes.

    1 KB=1000 bytes
    1 KB = 1024 bytes, come on

  3. Ali Hsn's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: 123K and 12.3K

    Quote Originally Posted by NDQuattro View Post
    yes.



    1 KB = 1024 bytes, come on
    You're right, NDQuattro. Yes, in computer science the exact number is 1024. I'm sorry for the typo : )) I'll correct it.

  4. charliedeut's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: 123K and 12.3K

    Quote Originally Posted by Ali Hsn View Post
    Yes, if by "K" you mean "Kilo".
    As far as I'm aware, that is the usual/intended meaning when using "K" for numbers.

    Incidentally, its use is accepted because "Kilo-" is a Latin prefix meaning "one thousand" (which, in turn, comes from the Greek "Khilioi-"): http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?...wed_in_frame=0).
    Last edited by charliedeut; 23-May-2014 at 09:49. Reason: minor typo
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

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