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  1. B45
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    #1

    I found the place right after I got the ice cream.

    You were carrying the ice cream the whole time you were lost?


    I got the ice cream a few minutes before I found/finding the place.


    I found the place right after I got the ice cream.

    Are all okay?
    Last edited by B45; 30-May-2014 at 01:46.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: I found the place right after I got the ice cream.

    Yes, they're all OK. You need "found" in the second sentence.
    It would be better to add "No" to the front of last two sentences, since that is the short answer to the question.
    "No, I bought the ice cream only a few minutes before I found the place."

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: I found the place right after I got the ice cream.

    The second sentence could be "I got the ice cream a few minutes before finding the place."

  4. B45
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    #4

    Re: I found the place right after I got the ice cream.

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    The second sentence could be "I got the ice cream a few minutes before finding the place."
    "I got the ice cream a few minutes before finding the place."

    Is finding in the sentence past tense or present tense here? Isn't find present tense?

  5. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: I found the place right after I got the ice cream.

    It is neither. It is a verbal (a derivative of a verb) called a gerund, which acts as a noun. In this case it is the object of the preposition "before". "The place" is the direct object of the gerund. Gerunds do not have tense because they are not verbs.

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