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    #1

    Question 'levitate'

    Hello,

    I came across this line in a news about the Hagia Sophia.

    It has served as the exalted seat of two faiths since its vast dome and lustrous gold mosaics first levitated above Istanbul in the 6th Century: Christendom's greatest cathedral for 900 years and one of Islam's greatest mosques for another 500.

    I used to think that 'to levitate' means to sort of float in the air, as ancient Indian holy men used to do in the stories, and as some (fake) Indian holy men still do. I also checked the dictionary meaning of 'levitate' and it says: "
    rise or cause to rise and hover in the air, especially by means of supernatural or magical power
    ."


    Is the word 'levitate' used correctly in the above sentence?
    Thank you

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: 'levitate'

    It is being used as a metaphor. The dome and mosaics were high in the air as if they were levitated.

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    #3

    Re: 'levitate'

    @MikeNewYork, thank you. I would have expected it to be something like - 'appeared to levitate'. Some tall structures (such as buildings or bridges) indeed appear to levitate if they rise above the clouds.

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    #4

    Re: 'levitate'

    Not a teacher.

    Hi,
    It has served as the exalted seat of two faiths since its vast dome and lustrous gold mosaics first levitated above Istanbul in the 6th Century: Christendom's greatest cathedral for 900 years and one of Islam's greatest mosques for another 500.

    The whole metaphore is created with connection to the exalted seat. (it's metonymy if I got it ritht.) To exalt means rise to high; to elevate as in rank; to lift up.

    Cheers
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 21-Jun-2014 at 18:53. Reason: Adding 'Not a teacher'.
    Please note I'm not a teacher nor a native speaker.

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    #5

    Re: 'levitate'

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaskin View Post

    The whole metaphor is created with connection to the exalted seat. (It's metonymy if I got it right.) 'To exalt' means to raise high; to elevate as in rank; to lift up.
    Please remember to state that you are not a teacher.

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    #6

    Re: 'levitate'

    Hi,

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    Please remember to state that you are not a teacher.
    Is my signature not showing ??

    Cheers
    Please note I'm not a teacher nor a native speaker.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: 'levitate'

    Your signature shows but remember that in the settings, it is possible for users to turn off signatures - that means that they don't see any signature lines at all. That's why it's important to put the information in the body of your post
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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