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    #1

    This sentence is from Collins dictionary. But is it really correct?

    Hello, everyone.

    Can you explain to me how the following sentence works?

    He sang much more sweetly than he has before.

    It seems to be wrong in every way, though it has to be correct because it's from a dictionary. Shouldn't people use had instead of has here?

    Many thanks

    Richard

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: This sentence is from Collins dictionary. But is it really correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by cubezero3 View Post
    Hello, everyone.

    Can you explain to me how the following sentence works?

    He sang much more sweetly than he has before.

    It seems to be wrong in every way, though it has to be correct because it's from a dictionary. Shouldn't people use had instead of has here?

    Many thanks

    Richard
    It's OK, "done" is understood after "has".

  2. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: This sentence is from Collins dictionary. But is it really correct?

    Does "has done" here refer to life experiences, i.e. he has never sung so sweetly before?

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: This sentence is from Collins dictionary. But is it really correct?

    Yes, he sang more sweetly than he has ever sung before.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #5

    Re: This sentence is from Collins dictionary. But is it really correct?

    I don't get it. I have always been told that present perfest conveys the meaning that one incident has lasted from past to present. So I'd think he has ever sung before describes a series of events which include what is described by the he sang more sweetly bit. Say he sang on April 1st, 2001. How could have he sung better than what he sang the same night? Isn't is contradiction in terms?

  4. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: This sentence is from Collins dictionary. But is it really correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by cubezero3 View Post
    How could have he sung better than what he sang the same night?
    He sang most sweetly at that night, not better at the same night.

    It is my interpretation, but I am not a teacher.

  5. Raymott's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: This sentence is from Collins dictionary. But is it really correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by cubezero3 View Post
    I don't get it. I have always been told that present perfest conveys the meaning that one incident has lasted from past to present.
    Would it make it easier to understand if you knew that that is false?
    Person A: "Have you ever sung in a choir."
    Person B: "Yes, I have sung in a choir. But that was many years ago.
    " This correct dialogue would seem to contradict what you've been taught.

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    #8

    Re: This sentence is from Collins dictionary. But is it really correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by cubezero3 View Post
    I have always been told that present perfest conveys the meaning that one incident has lasted from past to present.
    That's not the only possible meaning for the present perfect.

  6. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: This sentence is from Collins dictionary. But is it really correct?

    I guess the OP doesn't know the present perfect can apply to a life experience, which is explained on http://www.oneworldofenglish.com/eng..._your_life.htm

    Not a teacher.

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    #10

    Re: This sentence is from Collins dictionary. But is it really correct?

    If I were referring to a previous occasion, I would use "sang" and "sang" and I would specify the previous occasion.

    He sang more sweetly last night than he sang last Tuesday.
    He sang more sweetly that night than he sang the night before.

    However, note that the same idea can be written/said as:

    He sang more sweetly that night than he had sung the night before.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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