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    #1

    odd with "of" and "for"

    Hello users!

    QUESTION 1

    It's odd for bus drivers to tell jokes.
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/le...78_funny.shtml

    Does the sentence above mean "for bus drivers to tell jokes is odd" or "it is odd that bus drivers tell jokes"?

    Does the sentence refer to present and can it be said "It's odd of bus drivers to tell jokes"?

    QUESTION 2

    It was odd of her to do such a thing. Unfortunately, this example is in my English-Polish electronic dictionary in my office.

    Does the sentence above mean "She did such a thing and her behaviour was odd/strange"?

    We use this structure with reference to past, don't we?

    Thank you.

    • Member Info
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    • Posts: 524
    #2

    Re: odd with "of" and "for"

    Hi,
    Please note I'm not a native speaker nor a teacher.
    Quote Originally Posted by JACEK1 View Post
    Hello users!

    QUESTION 1

    It's odd for bus drivers to tell jokes.
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/le...78_funny.shtml

    Does the sentence above mean "for bus drivers to tell jokes is odd" or "it is odd that bus drivers tell jokes"?
    Yes.
    I fail to see any difference in meaning between the two sentences you posted. Let's replace the word odd with unusual or atypical.
    For bus drivers to tell jokes is atypical. It is atypical that bus drivers tell jokes.

    Does the sentence refer to present and can it be said "It's odd of bus drivers to tell jokes"?
    It describes situation that is habitual.
    I rarely do that but I'll exercise my linguistic intuition here when answering second part of your question; so please treat it with caution.
    I would say : 'It's odd of a bus driver to [..]' but 'It is odd for bus drivers to [..]'
    QUESTION 2

    It was odd of her to do such a thing. Unfortunately, this example is in my English-Polish electronic dictionary in my office.

    Does the sentence above mean "She did such a thing and her behaviour was odd/strange"?

    We use this structure with reference to past, don't we?

    Thank you.
    You could say it in the present, future or past, regardless whether such action actually happened. .
    In your example it is about action that took place in the past.

    Consider:
    It will be odd of her if she do such a thing.
    It would have been odd of her if she had done such a thing.

    Cheers
    Last edited by Jaskin; 08-Jun-2014 at 23:29.

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