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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    a social order

    Does this "social order" mean "social crime or fake"?

    26)Usually, however, some room for negotiation exists; that is, the parties involved have the option of negotiating a social order. So on the first day of class, a professor may negotiate with students, indicating it is okay to check text messages when the professor is passing out assignments but not during lecture or class discussion. (B) , professors know that they cannot ‘negotiate’ a social order in which students pay money to receive a desired grade.

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    #2

    Re: a social order

    No, it means the way that things are arranged, or ordered. The rules of that social situation. Rules that are set, in this example, by the professor who may "negotiate" on certain things with his students.

  2. keannu's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: a social order

    If order is a good thing, you can't bribe a professor to get A. The sentence sounds quite contradictory. Maybe, I'm misunderstanding, If I am, please correct me.

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: a social order

    You are misunderstanding. The piece says that a professor cannot negotiate that and have it be social order.

  4. keannu's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: a social order

    How can a corruption be called "social order"? and what does "negotiate" here mean?

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    #6

    Re: a social order

    A social order is the way things are organized in a society. If bribery is the way that things are done, then that is the ruling social order. "Order" in this case is not a moral judgment. It is not saying things are good. If you have to bribe a local official to get a permit to open a business, then that is part of the social order within that society.

    "Negotiate" is used somewhat loosely here. Obviously the professor is in charge of his classroom. But he gives the impression of having some input from the students, of allowing them some latitude in the rules about cell phone usage. He is not taking a hard line and banning phone use entirely. He knows that such a system would be hard to enforce and would make him unpopular. So he unilaterally "negotiates" down from the hard line position and allows an accommodation for phone use during less critical times during class.

  5. keannu's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: a social order

    Does the underlined mean that the professors will/can grant students' request for raising their mark or not?
    "Negotiation" sounds either possibility or impossiblity, so it's confusing. Does it mean professors will allow bribery for marks or not?

    College students know that when they enter a classroom on the first day of class, they should not walk to the front of the room and give instructions to the class. (A) , professors know that on the first day of class, students expect them to give an overview of the course and lay out expectations such as no texting during class. Usually, however, some room for negotiation exists; that is, the parties involved have the option of negotiating a social order. So on the first day of class, a professor may negotiate with students, indicating it is okay to check text messages when the professor is passing out assignments but not during lecture or class discussion. However, professors know that they cannot ‘negotiate’ a social order in which students pay money to receive a desired grade.

  6. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: a social order

    However, professors know that they cannot ‘negotiate’ a social order in which students pay money to receive a desired grade.

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