Results 1 to 8 of 8
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Romanian
      • Home Country:
      • Romania
      • Current Location:
      • Romania

    • Join Date: Jun 2014
    • Posts: 3
    #1

    to drop the ball?

    Hi, ESL students!


    I'm running a survey aiming to identify if the English idioms cause confusion


    and misunderstanding among ESL students and inhibit daily conversations.


    Can you, please, tell me if the following idiom is clear to you


    http://blog.idiophrases.com/post/867...-drop-the-ball and would


    you be able to use it on a daily basis?


    Thanks in advance.
    Last edited by alexinlove; 18-Jun-2014 at 06:51.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,833
    #2

    Re: to drop the ball?

    North Korean leaders have always been enigmatic ones: no one ever knew what made the tick
    That should be makes them tick. I would delete ones.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Romanian
      • Home Country:
      • Romania
      • Current Location:
      • Romania

    • Join Date: Jun 2014
    • Posts: 3
    #3

    Re: to drop the ball?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    That should be makes them tick. I would delete ones.

    I agree. Thanks for the heads-up!

  1. Tarheel's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jun 2014
    • Posts: 10,976
    #4

    Re: to drop the ball?

    I would say:


    North Korean leaders have always been enigmatic. No one ever knows what makes them tick.
    (Why did you pick that title? Just because it's an idiom?)

    (BTW, can you guess who this is?)

  2. charliedeut's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
      • Home Country:
      • Spain
      • Current Location:
      • Spain

    • Join Date: Oct 2009
    • Posts: 5,560
    #5

    Re: to drop the ball?

    Pardon both my ignorance and boldness: what does the title have to do with the subject matter of this thread?
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,822
    #6

    Re: to drop the ball?

    That's a very good question.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Romanian
      • Home Country:
      • Romania
      • Current Location:
      • Romania

    • Join Date: Jun 2014
    • Posts: 3
    #7

    Re: to drop the ball?

    Pardon both my ignorance and boldness: what does the title have to do with the subject matter of this thread?
    Obviously, I confused the link referring to the idiom in question. I corrected it. Thanks for the heads-up.

  4. Newbie
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jul 2014
    • Posts: 4
    #8

    Re: to drop the ball?

    As a native speaker of American English, "drop the ball" means more than an individual failure. It is a failure that affects the group of people you are a part of. I suspect it comes from the sport of baseball.

    Examples:

    "The Atlanta Braves lost a chance to tie the game in the 6th inning because the outfielder tripped and dropped the ball instead of throwing it to 2nd base." (here "dropping the ball" is literal and shows how it may have had its origin).

    "We all have to work late because Tim dropped the ball and forgot to bring his tools."

    "The Democrats failed to achieve an early filibuster-proof majority in the Senate in 2008 because the party in Massachusetts dropped the ball by fielding a very weak candidate to fill the seat of the late Ted Kennedy. This allowed a Republican to win instead."

    This idiom is especially prevalent in the business place. If someone drops the ball too many times they tend to get fired.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 06-Oct-2011, 14:30
  2. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-Oct-2009, 15:55
  3. [General] drop the ball/turn down/go on/throw out/
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-Sep-2009, 18:33
  4. [Grammar] ball vs ball of string/wool
    By dreamer2009 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-Jun-2009, 15:24
  5. ⓐdrop by ( ⓑstop over / ⓒdrop off )
    By flytothesky in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 22-Dec-2008, 19:52

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •