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  1. Crowned 91's Avatar
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    #1

    She is neither English nor American.

    Hi!
    Which is the correct sentence?

    - She is neither English nor American.
    -Neither is she English, nor is she American.
    -She isn't either English or American.
    - She isn't English or American.
    -She isn't English; neither is she American.
    -She isn't English; nor is she American.

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    #2

    Re: She is neither English nor American.

    "Which is the correct sentence?"

    What makes you think there is only one correct sentence?

  2. Crowned 91's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: She is neither English nor American.

    Ok, what are the correct ones? I found examples with the first sentence and the third one in grammar books. But are the other sentences also possible?

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    #4

    Re: She is neither English nor American.

    2 is wrong. The rest are OK.

  3. Roman55's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: She is neither English nor American.

    I am not a teacher.

    The rest might be OK but they don't have the same meaning. 1, 4, 5 and 6 all mean that she is not English and she is not American either.

    Number 3 means that the statement, "She is either English or American" is untrue. It might be true that she is either English or Welsh, or that she is either American or Canadian. So, she could be either English or American. Or then again no.

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    #6

    Re: She is neither English nor American.

    If you want to refer to her nationality, British would be the term. English is not an official nationality.

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: She is neither English nor American.

    I'd say the last one needs a comma instead of a semi-colon. Isn't "nor" a coordinating conjunction?
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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