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    #1

    walk all over

    Hi everyone,

    What is the meaning of " I hope you don't walk all over everyone else like this" ?
    Thank you.

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    #2

    Re: walk all over

    "To walk all over" someone is to harrass, bully, or betray them.

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    #3

    Re: walk all over

    I agree with "harass" and "bully". I would add "to treat with disrespect". I don't see "betrayal" in that idiom.

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    #4

    Re: walk all over

    In this external link, all three of my senses are clearly present, as well as MikeNewYork's addition.

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    #5

    Re: walk all over

    In that relationship advice article, I see a lot of disrespect, but I don't see betrayal.

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    #6

    Re: walk all over

    When a woman says about her ex-boyfriend that "he walked all over me" by breaking up immediately after pretending he loved her and getting her into bed, as for example here, I think there's a definite betrayal of trust involved. Don't you?

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    #7

    Re: walk all over

    That is not what the idiom means. Even the "oh poor me" relationship website did not suggest that. If a guy shoots a girl in the head, would you say he "walked all over her"? If a guy stole a woman's car, would you say "he walked all over her"? The idiom does not cover every evil act ever committed.

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    #8

    Re: walk all over

    I wouldn't be taking anything written by the sobbing teenager in Seventeen magazine as grammatically relevant. Never mind her emotional state, I would say she doesn't understand the idiom "to walk all over somebody" either.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #9

    Re: walk all over

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I wouldn't be taking anything written by the sobbing teenager in Seventeen magazine as grammatically relevant.
    I was afraid you'd say that. I think your attitude is inappropriate in this case for two reasons, even aside from your apparent dismissal of teenage human emotions. First, the discussion is not about grammatical usage but about lexical usage. Under question is the meaning of the phrase "to walk all over someone", not the grammatical literacy of those who use it. Second, "to walk all over someone" is colloquial at best. It is certainly not formal English in any sense of the word. Therefore my link to Seventeen is appropriate, and its non-standard punctuation and spelling should be allowed for. Any phrase has the meaning people choose to give it in all sincerity.

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    #10

    Re: walk all over

    This discussion is about the meaning of an idiom. It is not about personal problems. And there are things in English that are as important as bare meaning. "Me and Jimmy be going to the park" has meaning, but I wouldn't recommend it.

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