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    #1

    givest with imperative

    A boy is telling her sister to give him something, using the imperative but with the (implied) archaic second person singular pronoun Thou.

    Regular statement "Thou givest me the toy."

    But with imperative mood, do I just rearrange, or put "to give" in the infinitive form?

    With the imperative, it is: "Just (Thou) givest me the toy!" or "Just give me the toy!"? Or even "Just givest (Thou) me the toy!"

    Thanks for any insight!
    Last edited by atemp; 18-Jun-2014 at 00:43. Reason: forgot extra info

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: givest with imperative

    Were I you, I would forget the archaic forms "thou" and "givest" unless you have a time machine.

    "Just give me the toy".

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    #3

    Re: givest with imperative

    The imperative is "give" even with "thou". The "thou" follows, not precedes.

    O God, give Thou ear to my plea, And hide not Thyself from my cry.

    In anything except solemn prayer, this construction sounds terrible today. Say it not! (That's also pretty bad, actually.)

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    #4

    Re: givest with imperative

    Quote Originally Posted by abaka View Post
    The imperative is "give" even with "thou". The "thou" follows, not precedes.
    Thank you very much indeed, abaka. I suspected the unconjugated verb worked in there somehow.

    BTW I have my reasons for blowing the dust off 17th century Early Modern English; archaic does not equate to incorrect.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: givest with imperative

    Note that a boy is telling his sister, not her sister.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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