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  1. B45
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    #1

    You don't have to be conservative with/to me.

    You don't have to be conservative with/to me.

    Are both useable?

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: You don't have to be conservative with/to me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Batman45 View Post
    You don't have to be conservative with/to me.

    Are both useable?
    What does it mean?

  3. B45
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    #3

    Re: You don't have to be conservative with/to me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    What does it mean?
    My friend is very shy and conservative even after being friends with me for nearly 4 years. So, I say:

    You don't have to be conservative with/to me.

    Are both okay?

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    #4

    Re: You don't have to be conservative with/to me.

    With

  4. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: You don't have to be conservative with/to me.

    "You don't have to be conservative with/to me." Would that be a natural thing to say in AmE, Dave? It would sound very strange in BrE.

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    #6

    Re: You don't have to be conservative with/to me.

    No, it's not terribly natural. But I know what he means. "Reserved" would be a better word.

  5. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: You don't have to be conservative with/to me.

    I guess I would understand it to mean "It's okay to curse or talk about your sex life with me."
    If I wanted to say something that meant this, I'd probably say "You know, it's okay to loosen up some with me."

    Edited to fix typo
    Last edited by Barb_D; 19-Jun-2014 at 23:32.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  6. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: You don't have to be conservative with/to me.

    "Loose" or "loosen"?

  7. Raymott's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: You don't have to be conservative with/to me.

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    "You don't have to be conservative with/to me." Would that be a natural thing to say in AmE, Dave? It would sound very strange in BrE.
    To me, it might mean, "You don't have to pretend to be a member of the NRA, a committed Christian, and opposed tooth and nail to Obama's healthcare policies." Naturally, the political environment would change the actual details of the sentence. I agree with Dave that 'reserved' is a much better word, or 'reticent'.
    Or you could frame it in a positive sense: "You can be more open with me" or something to that effect.

  8. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: You don't have to be conservative with/to me.

    I agree with the final part of Raymott's post. I would say "You do know that you can completely relax with me, don't you?" or something. It would be interesting to know what behaviour your friend does/doesn't exhibit in order for you to state that they are "conservative" with you.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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