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    #1

    Question What's the correct?

    If I want to call a woman a bitch, which option do I use?

    "You Bitch" or "Bitch!"?

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    #2

    Re: What's the correct?

    If you must, then either version will get the point across.

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    #3

    Re: What's the correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    If you must, then either version will get the point across.
    SHE: Enjoy your trip, baby!

    HE: You bitch!

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: What's the correct?

    Confirming you know this is offensive, right? Really offensive to some?

    We tend to use the "you" that way.
    You jerk!
    You rat bastard!
    You son of a b*tch!
    You b*itch!
    You greedy bastard!
    You obnoxious, lying @ssh*ole!
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  2. Grumpy's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: What's the correct?

    I'll be careful not to fall out with you, Barb!!
    I'm not a teacher of English, but I have spoken it for (almost) all of my life....

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    #6

    Re: What's the correct?

    Oh, sweetie, that's just what I felt comfortable typing in public forum.

    However, I'm most effective when I don't use swear words at all, but just slice you up with understatement, sarcasm, and/or a very precise use of vocabulary. When that happens, it's a very quiet voice, not the one that goes with "You rat bastard!" It happens very rarely, though.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 19-Jun-2014 at 22:08.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  4. Grumpy's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: What's the correct?

    ...which reminds me of this script extract from Episode 14 of the incomparable British comedy "Monty Python's Flying Circus". It concerns a pair of East London gangsters: Dinsdale and Doug Piranha. Dinsdale's speciality was nailing people's heads to the floor; Doug was even more intimidating..
    The interviewer is asking Luigi Vercotti, owner of a "high class escort agency" about his run-in with the Piranha Brothers.
    Vercotti Doug! (takes a drink)I was terrified of him. Everyone was terrified of Doug. I've seen grown men pull their own heads off rather than see Doug. Even Dinsdale was frightened of Doug.
    Interviewer What did he do?
    Vercotti He used sarcasm. He knew all the tricks, dramatic irony, metaphor, bathos, puns, parody, litotes and satire.
    Cut to map.
    Presenter (voice over) By a combination of violence and sarcasm, the Piranha brothers by February 1966 controlled London and the South East. ...

    Many British men of a certain age can still recite their favourite Monty Python episodes word for word. I say "men" advisedly; most women seem to have more sense.
    I'm not a teacher of English, but I have spoken it for (almost) all of my life....

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    #8

    Re: What's the correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by Grumpy View Post
    ...which reminds me of this script extract from Episode 14 of the incomparable British comedy "Monty Python's Flying Circus". It concerns a pair of East London gangsters: Dinsdale and Doug Piranha. Dinsdale's speciality was nailing people's heads to the floor; Doug was even more intimidating..
    The interviewer is asking Luigi Vercotti, owner of a "high class escort agency" about his run-in with the Piranha Brothers.
    Vercotti Doug! (takes a drink)I was terrified of him. Everyone was terrified of Doug. I've seen grown men pull their own heads off rather than see Doug. Even Dinsdale was frightened of Doug.
    Interviewer What did he do?
    Vercotti He used sarcasm. He knew all the tricks, dramatic irony, metaphor, bathos, puns, parody, litotes and satire.
    Cut to map.
    Presenter (voice over) By a combination of violence and sarcasm, the Piranha brothers by February 1966 controlled London and the South East. ...

    Many British men of a certain age can still recite their favourite Monty Python episodes word for word. I say "men" advisedly; most women seem to have more sense.
    "(voice over)" means (only voice)?

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    #9

    Re: What's the correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by ceciliafontes View Post
    "(voice over)" means (only voice)?
    It means someone is narrating. You hear, but don't see, the narrator.

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    #10

    Question Re: What's the correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    It means someone is narrating. You hear, but don't see, the narrator.
    Can I use "voice over" in a scene of phone call?

    (I'm writing a script)

    He answering his phone.
    JOHN: Hello, Julia!
    JULIA: Hi, John!
    JOHN: It's too early!
    JULIA (only voice): Sorry, I know!

    Or> JULIA (voice over): Sorry, I know!

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