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    #1

    A suspicious woman

    Hello
    I am a bit confused about the word suspicious. Please read the background to see what I have a problem with.

    Background: a woman rushed to the exit, she rushed off a plane, but she was stopped by the cabin crew because she was suspicious, her behaviour was suspicious.

    1. By rushing to the exit she became suspicious of planting a bomb and stopped by the cabin crew.

    Is the verb suspicious used correctly here? Or maybe I should say:

    2. By rushing to the exit she became suspected of planning a bomb and stopped by the cabin crew.

    Are both correct?
    Thank you

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: A suspicious woman

    The first is not correct. It was the crew who became suspicious, not the woman.

    In #2, I would change "became" to "was" and "planning" to "planting".

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    #3

    Re: A suspicious woman

    Thanks for clarifying. So now we could say:

    She rushed off the plane. The cabin crew became suspicious of her behaviour, and as a result she was suspected of planting a bomb.

    PS
    So I was right to be suspicious of the two tricky expressions. On the other hand, I have never been suspected of anything wrong :)

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: A suspicious woman

    You really shouldn't say that someone was suspected because because someone else was suspicious. Try again.

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    #5

    Re: A suspicious woman

    What do you mean? Why not? It was suspicious when she rushed off the plane. The airport security was alarmed by a stewardess. She was questioned by the police and suspected of planting a bomb.

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: A suspicious woman

    I mean that it is very clumsy to say: "You were suspected because you were suspicious". Choose another set of words.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: A suspicious woman

    Be warned though that it is perfectly possible to say that the woman on the plane looked suspicious. That means she looked like she was doing something wrong/illegal.

    She looked suspicious which made the crew suspicious.

    Note that that's not a good combination words for the same reason Mike gave about "suspected/suspicious".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. Raymott's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: A suspicious woman

    Just to underline a point: 'suspicious' can be applied to both the suspect and person who suspects them. In that sense, it can be ambiguous.
    "The policeman saw a man acting suspiciously, and he became suspicious." It's not that being suspicious is contagious; it's that it has two complementary meanings.

  6. Roman55's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: A suspicious woman

    I am not a teacher.

    Yes, indeed.
    In fact, when someone becomes suspicious they don't become suspicious themselves, they become suspicous of someone or something else.

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    #10

    Re: A suspicious woman

    Note:

    The airport security was alarmed alerted by a stewardess.

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