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  1. #1

    Why not "select .. as"?

    this is an exercise from the TOEFL
    12. The Texas Legislature selected Vassar Miller _____ in 1982, and again in 1988.
    (A) was the state’s poet laureate
    (B) as the state’s poet laureate
    (C) the state’s poet laureate
    (D) become the state’s poet laureate
    the Key is C
    but why is B wrong?

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #2

    Re: Why not "select .. as"?

    It's a typographical error. (B) is the correct choice. Choice (C) requires two commas,

    The Texas Legislature selected Vassar Miller,the state's poet laureate, in 1982, and again in 1988.

    Welcome, Wandonye.

  3. #3

    Re: Why not "select .. as"?

    Thank u, Casiopea:), I'm a newcomer.
    Is this usage of "select" the same as "give", or other verbs which can be used like "v. + object +object complement"?
    If yes, why in the sentence, "I gave Tom a book", no comma between "Tom" and "a book"?
    I mean how to judge whether there should be a comma or not?
    Thank u again:)

  4. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #4

    Re: Why not "select .. as"?

    An object complement comes after the verb's object and it "complements" or adds further meaning to the object, wheras an indirect object does not.

    [1] They call him John.
    => 'John' complements the verb's object 'him'.

    [1] I gave John the book.
    => 'John' doesn't complement the verb's object 'the book'. It's an indirect object.

  5. #5

    Unhappy Re: Why not "select .. as"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    An object complement comes after the verb's object and it "complements" or adds further meaning to the object, wheras an indirect object does not.

    [1] They call him John.
    => 'John' complements the verb's object 'him'.

    [1] I gave John the book.
    => 'John' doesn't complement the verb's object 'the book'. It's an indirect object.
    I know that, but when it comes to "select", in the case of your correction:
    The Texas Legislature selected Vassar Miller,the state's poet laureate, in 1982, and again in 1988.
    Why there should be two commas?

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    #6

    Re: Why not "select .. as"?

    Hello W.

    The version with two commas means:

    1. The TL selected VM, (who is) the state's poet laureate, in 1982, etc.

    You might use this version to answer the question: "When did the TL select VM, the state's poet laureate?".

    MrP

  6. #7

    Re: Why not "select .. as"?

    I see, Thank u MrP. :)

    Still another thing I'm not quite sure:
    "Select" cannot be used like: "select+object+indirect object"
    So, "The Texas Legislature selected Vassar Miller the state's poet laureate in 1982, and again in 1988." without the two comma is incorrect.
    Am I right?

  7. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Why not "select .. as"?

    Mr. Pedantic:

    I have a question. In the example, if poet laureate is an official title or position, wouldn't C then be the correct answer, and without an additional comma?

    The Texas Legislature selected Vassar Miller the state's Poet Laureate in 1982, and again in 1988.

    (I'm presuming Poet Laureate would then be capitalized, and I don't know if it was or not in the original test question.)

    In any case, I don't think two commas are appropriate, as the point of the sentence is that Ms. Miller was selected to the position of poet laureate. If you use two commas and remove the apposotive phrase, the sentence reads:


    The Texas Legislature selected Vassar Miller in 1982, and again in 1988.

    The sentence doesn't make much sense then, because it doesn't tell us what Ms. Miller was selected for.


  8. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #9

    Re: Why not "select .. as"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch
    I have a question. In the example, if poet laureate is an official title or position, wouldn't C then be the correct answer, and without an additional comma?
    An appositive renames the noun it modifies. Compare,

    The Texas Legislature selected Vassar Miller, (who is) the state's poet laureate, to read Senator Dell's eulogy in 1982.

    The Texas Legislature selected poet laureate Vassar Miller to read Senator Dell's eulogy in 1982.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch
    In any case, I don't think two commas are appropriate, as the point of the sentence is that Ms. Miller was selected to the position of poet laureate.
    Right.

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    #10

    Re: Why not "select .. as"?

    Quote Originally Posted by wandonye
    I see, Thank u MrP. :)
    Still another thing I'm not quite sure:
    "Select" cannot be used like: "select+object+indirect object"
    So, "The Texas Legislature selected Vassar Miller the state's poet laureate in 1982, and again in 1988." without the two comma is incorrect.
    Am I right?
    Hello Wandonye

    That's right.

    1. The TL selected VM as the state's poet laureate in 1982...
    2. The TL selected VM, the state's poet laureate, in 1982...

    In #1, the TL appoints VM to the post of poet laureate.

    In #2, the TL appoints VM, who is poet laureate, to some other post.

    See you,
    MrP

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