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  1. B45
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    #1

    Girl wants to get in a almost full elevator. Someone blurts out:

    Girl wants to get in a almost full elevator. Someone blurts out:

    No worries, we could/can fit one more!

    Are both okay?

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Girl wants to get in a almost full elevator. Someone blurts out:

    Yes.

  3. B45
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    #3

    Re: Girl wants to get in a almost full elevator. Someone blurts out:

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    Yes.
    Why is could correct as well? Isn't could used as a possibility or suggestion?

    Shouldn't it be can, because we can fit one more?

  4. Roman55's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Girl wants to get in a almost full elevator. Someone blurts out:

    I am not a teacher.

    I would say "can". I would also say "an almost-full elevator".

    Well, actually I'd say "lift" but you get my point.

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    #5

    Re: Girl wants to get in a almost full elevator. Someone blurts out:

    "Can" is natural here. "Could" is possible, but unlikely.

  5. charliedeut's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Girl wants to get in a almost full elevator. Someone blurts out:

    I personally feel that "can" is somehow more inviting, more "sure-no-worries-get-in"-ish, while "could" suggests to me that the speaker is sort of resigned, as if they felt the girl will get in irrespective of their opinion. I would still favor "can", though.
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

  6. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Girl wants to get in a almost full elevator. Someone blurts out:

    Quote Originally Posted by charliedeut View Post
    I personally feel that "can" is somehow more inviting, more "sure-no-worries-get-in"-ish, while "could" suggests to me that the speaker is sort of resigned, as if they felt the girl will get in irrespective of their opinion. I would still favor "can", though.
    Charlie, I can't support this idea of "could." I suppose you are thinking the implied conditional is "... if you insist on forcing yourself in."

    I'd say it's "could" because the implied conditional is "...if you want to try to squish in with us."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #8

    Re: Girl wants to get in a almost full elevator. Someone blurts out:

    The speaker might use could to suggest it's possible if the others agree- it doesn't go so well with no worries, though.

  7. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Girl wants to get in a almost full elevator. Someone blurts out:

    I find it very strange that he should blurt it out rather than just say it naturally.
    Last edited by bhaisahab; 26-Jun-2014 at 10:41.

  8. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Girl wants to get in a almost full elevator. Someone blurts out:

    Quote Originally Posted by Batman45 View Post
    A girl wants to get in an almost full elevator.
    Note my corrections above.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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