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    #1

    No worries

    I am aware that 'no worries' is a typical response to 'thank you/thanks...', but can I use it in the 2 following situations?

    situation 1:

    Let's say I'm running a workshop. I write something like:

    "Computer skills are indispensable nowadays... a lot of people get frustrated when computers freeze or crash; they are at a loss when no technicians are around...
    No worries!Here’s your chance to learn more about how to tackle these problems yourself! In this workshop, we will cover..... "

    The 'no worries' means - don't worry, you can get some help here. Can I use it in this way potentially?

    situation 2:

    A: I'm very sorry but I can't come tomorrow night. Something urgent popped up.
    B: No worries! We can always meet at another time.


    Thanks

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Can we use 'no worries' in these ways?

    I have started a new thread with your new question.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: No worries

    I would not use it for 1. Use "Don't worry."
    I would use it for 2.

    "No worries" really means "Don't be sorry" or "No need to apologize" not "There is nothing to worry about."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #4

    Re: No worries

    And it's not a typical response in AmE. At least not in my area. It came from Australia, I believe.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: No worries

    I live only a couple hundred miles east of Dave, and we use it *all the time*! So it must be very regional.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #6

    Re: No worries

    One of my co-workers was just up in western Canada for a job and they used it up there a lot.

    "No problem" is the common response to a "thanks" here.

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: No worries

    I have always hated "no problem" as a response to "thank you."
    It's so ungracious.

    I also don't see "no worries" used as a response to "thank you." It's used as a response to an apology, implied or explicity.

    I must be causing you a lot if inconvenience. // No worries. It's my pleasure to help you.
    I'm sorry I can't make the meeting. // No worries. I'll catch up with you afterwards.
    Oh my gosh - I just stepped on your toe. Oh, I'm so sorry! // No worries. I've got another foot just like it.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #8

    Re: Can 'no worries' be used in these 2 situations?

    I would consider this to be acceptable informal English. I would not use an idiomatic expression like that in a research (or similar) paper.

  5. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: No worries

    Where I grew up in the US and where I live now, "no worries" is not common, except from Australians. I agree with Dave that "no problem" is more common in the US and is not considered ungracious.

  6. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: No worries

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    and is not considered ungracious.
    ... by everyone.

    I hate it.

    Especially when it's their JOB to do it. If I thank my waitress for bringing me my drink, I don't expect to be told it was a problem, so I don't need to hear it is NOT a problem to do what they are getting paid for. You're welcome. My pleasure. Of course. Any of those are fine. Glad doing your job isn't a problem, but keep that information to yourself, please.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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