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  1. B45
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    #1

    Do you say: I want a hotdog without buns. VS I want a hotdog without the buns.

    Do you say: I want a hotdog without buns. VS I want a hotdog without the buns.

    Are both okay?

  2. charliedeut's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Do you say: I want a hotdog without buns. VS I want a hotdog without the buns.

    I guess the hot-dog/bun ratio is 1/1, so it should be "bun", not "buns".
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Do you say: I want a hotdog without buns. VS I want a hotdog without the buns.

    It should certainly be in the singular and it would work perfectly well with the definite or indefinite article.

    I would like a hot dog without a bun.
    I would like a hot dog without the bun.


    One hot dog please. No bun.

    Technically, however, it's only a hot dog if it's a steamed sausage in a bun. Without the bun, you just want a sausage (or a frankfurter, in BrE).
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Do you say: I want a hotdog without buns. VS I want a hotdog without the buns.

    Bun or not, it is still a "hot dog" in the US. We buy packs of "hot dogs". We use "'frankfurter" or "franks" sometimes, but "sausage" means something different.

  5. B45
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    #5

    Re: Do you say: I want a hotdog without buns. VS I want a hotdog without the buns.

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    Bun or not, it is still a "hot dog" in the US. We buy packs of "hot dogs". We use "'frankfurter" or "franks" sometimes, but "sausage" means something different.
    What if I change hotdog to hamburger?

    One hamburger without the buns. I want it protein style. Can I omit the 'the'?

  6. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Do you say: I want a hotdog without buns. VS I want a hotdog without the buns.

    It would still be "a bun" or "the" bun". The word "bun" means both top and bottom.

  7. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Do you say: I want a hotdog without buns. VS I want a hotdog without the buns.

    You have a burger "in a bun". It is one single hamburger bun which has been sliced in half. That doesn't make it "buns". I don't know about AmE, but in BrE "protein-style" means nothing. I understand what you mean - you want the protein of the meat in the hamburger without the carbs of the bun, but we don't use that phrase here.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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