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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    Question Singled out

    Can you "single out" more than one thing or person? e.g. "Geoffrey Boycott has criticised Alastair Cook for his lack of tactical awareness. Boycott has also singled out Matt Prior for criticism."

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    #2

    Re: Singled out

    Welcome to the forums, Minton.

    Dictionaries state that the phrasal verb 'single out' only takes one object.

    However, your quoted sentences sound perfectly natural and acceptable to me. I see no need to change them.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 29-Jun-2014 at 08:46.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Singled out

    You might have a problem with "Geoffrey Boycott has singled out Alastair Cook and Matt Prior for criticism."
    To comply with the dictionary, you can single out as many people as you like, as long as you do it one at a time. But remember this is sports commentary.

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