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    #1

    were all out for 482

    India were all out for 482 following lunch on the third day.

    Does 'were all out' mean 'were trying hard' in this sentence? And what does 'for 482' mean?

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: were all out for 482

    What is the context of this sentence?
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #3

    Re: were all out for 482

    There is no context. I was reading the COLLINS COBUILD USAGE when I came across this sentence in the entry of 'following':

    India were all out for 482 following lunch on the third day. This use is fairly common, but many
    people think that it is incorrect. Insentences like these, it is better to use after, rather than `following'.

    And I feel puzzled by what the sentence means.

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: were all out for 482

    "Following" is fine; "after" is OK also.

    I think this is a reference to "cricket".

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    #5

    Re: were all out for 482

    Yes, this is about cricket. It means that all the players on the Indian side were "out" (bowled out, caught out etc) but before they were all out, they had managed to score 482 runs in their innings.
    If you don't know anything at all about cricket, most of what I have just said will be meaningless. It is one of the most difficult sports to explain to someone who knows nothing at all about it. The rules are a little like baseball (cricket purists will be jumping up and down in horror at the moment!) but only in the sense that there are two teams, one of which bats and the other fields and the idea is to get the other team all out without them scoring any runs (home runs in baseball). There the similarity ends.

    And we almost always say "following lunch" in a cricket context. There is nothing wrong with "after lunch" but "following" is traditionally used.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: were all out for 482

    Baseball fans would jump up and down also.

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    #7

    Re: were all out for 482

    Thank you ever so much for the great trouble you took, moderator, and Mike and Barb. After reading your replies, I did quite some web research on cricket and got to understand the sentence and learned quite a bit about cricket as well. Thank you very much again.

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    #8

    Re: were all out for 482

    I am not a teacher.

    Cricket as explained to a foreigner. Often seen in pubs in my youth.

    You have two sides, one out in the field and one in. Each man that's in the side that's in goes out, and when he's out he comes in and the next man goes in until he's out. When they are all out, the side that's out comes in and the side that's been in goes out and tries to get those coming in, out. Sometimes you get men still in and not out.
    When a man goes out to go in, the men who are out try to get him out, and when he is out he goes in and the next man in goes out and goes in. There are two men called umpires who stay out all the time and they decide when the men who are in are out. When both sides have been in and all the men have been out, and both sides have been out twice after all the men have been in, including those who are not out, that is the end of the game

  6. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: were all out for 482

    Sounds absolutely fascinating.

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    #10

    Re: were all out for 482

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    Baseball fans would jump up and down also.
    Both sports are completely impenetrable to outsiders. I have seen the news in Japan hundreds of times and am no clearer about what the stream of baseball statistics means. Over the same time, I have accidentally acquired a reasonable understanding of sumo wrestling, which makes far more sense. Baseball, like cricket, cannot be learned by passive assimilation. I think comparing them on the yadda yadda scale is fair. Both sports have contributed disproportionately to sporting idioms because they had to as they make no sense.

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