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    #1

    a formal way to say "around"

    Can I use "around" to mean approximate time in a formal document? For example,

    The company will start the ad campaign around July to Semtemper this year.

    (By this "around", I want to say that the exact timing is unknown. It could be late June or early October.)

    If it can't be used in a formal document like this, please tell me a better way to say it.

  1. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: a formal way to say "around"

    As the exact date is unknown, why not say 'sometime between June and October'?

    Not a teacher.

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    #3

    Re: a formal way to say "around"

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    As the exact date is unknown, why not say 'sometime between June and October'?
    No, it doesn't work in this context. As I wrote in my post, it could be late June or early October. It's not "sometime BETWEEN June and October".

    I'll wait for a reply from a native speaker.

    [CORRECTION]
    I meant, "it could also be late June or early October.
    Last edited by herbivorie; 04-Jul-2014 at 14:44.

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    #4

    Re: a formal way to say "around"

    I am not clear. Will it start in late June or in early October and at no time in between? That does not fit with the original phrasing "around July to September this year".

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    #5

    Re: a formal way to say "around"

    If 'at no time in between', should it be 'around July or September this year'?

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    #6

    Re: a formal way to say "around"

    I would use either in late June or in early October.

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    #7

    Re: a formal way to say "around"

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    I am not clear. Will it start in late June or in early October and at no time in between? That does not fit with the original phrasing "around July to September this year".
    By "around July to September", I meant that the approximate time is "July to Semtember".
    So, it could be late June, July, August, September, or early October.

    I corrected post#3.

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    #8

    Re: a formal way to say "around"

    If the possible date may vary so widely, why not say 'later this year'?

    b

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    #9

    Re: a formal way to say "around"

    Quote Originally Posted by herbivorie View Post
    By "around July to September", I meant that the approximate time is "July to Semtember".
    So, it could be late June, July, August, September, or early October.

    I corrected post#3.
    But in post #3, you still say "It's not "sometime BETWEEN June and October" but in post #7, you said "it could be late June, July, August, September, or early October." July, August and September are all between June and October.

    The only way to say it is "The company will start the ad campaign sometime between late June and early October". That only refers to the start date, though.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #10

    Re: a formal way to say "around"

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    But in post #3, you still say "It's not "sometime BETWEEN June and October" but in post #7, you said "it could be late June, July, August, September, or early October." July, August and September are all between June and October.
    By that, I meant "It's not only sometime between June and October".

    What I'm looking for is just a formal version of "around" (if any), like "approximately" is a formal version of "about".

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