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    #1

    You often think (of) nothing.

    1. You often think of nothing.

    2. You often think nothing.

    Is sentence #2 acceptable?
    I need native speakers' help.

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    #2

    Re: You often think (of) nothing.

    In what context do you want to use it?

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    #3

    Re: You often think (of) nothing.

    It's a Latin translation exercise. There is no context. The original Latin sentence is as follows: Saepe nihil cogitas. saepe = often; nihil = nothing; cogitas = you think
    My Latin teacher thinks #2 is unidiomatic English. Is he correct?
    Last edited by sitifan; 04-Jul-2014 at 08:41.
    I need native speakers' help.

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    #4

    Re: You often think (of) nothing.

    Your teacher is correct. #2 is unidiomatic.

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: You often think (of) nothing.

    As a stand-alone sentence, I don't think much of the first one either.

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