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    #1

    work for shoot

    I was going to do some translation. I need to know if it would work to use 'to work' for 'to open fire on' as in "The military is not going work the nonmilitary targets."?

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: work for shoot

    If you wrote that, I would have no idea what you meant. I have certainly never heard "work" used to mean "to open fire on". Why do you think we use it that way?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: work for shoot

    It's just that in my native language, if translated word for word into English,in the military they tend to use informally the expression "to work/on targets" to mean "to open fire on targets".

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: work for shoot

    You might occasionally hit on a correct collocation using that method, but almost all teachers would point out its unreliability. If you had seen it used somewhere, it might be worth asking about.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: work for shoot

    I believe the better plan is to translate TO your native language. You'll know what's natural and right when it's your own language.
    Trying to translate to English will almost always result in unnatural language until you have native-like fluency.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #6

    Re: work for shoot

    I did a few searches and it doesn't look like the word is used in that way in English- it's not a standard or common term, anyway.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 06-Jul-2014 at 16:30. Reason: typo

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