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    #1

    using "of"

    Hello

    Listening to a radio I have noticed that there are many different ways to use a word "of" in english. I'm trying to figure out if there is a logic of using "of". Due to this I have listed some sentences below that might be helpful for understanding principles. Are these in correct form?

    I知 annoyed of what he said to me.
    I felt happy of hearing it.
    I知 concerned of you.
    I知 afraid of not understanding of the advantages of green energy.
    I predict him of getting sacked soon.


    Thank you

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: using "of"

    Welcome to Using English.


    Quote Originally Posted by Tepari View Post
    Hello

    Listening to a radio I have noticed that there are many different ways to use a word "of" in English. I'm trying to figure out if there is a logic of using "of". Due to this I have listed some sentences below that might be helpful for understanding principles. Are these in correct form?

    I’m annoyed of what he said to me. No. I'm annoyed about what he said to me.
    I felt happy of hearing it. No. Either "I felt happy hearing it" or "I felt happy upon hearing it" or possibly "I felt happy about hearing it."
    I’m concerned of you. No. I'm concerned about you or concerned for you.
    I’m afraid of not understanding of the advantages of green energy. Yes, we are afraid of something.
    I predict him of getting sacked soon. No. No preposition at all.


    Thank you
    It's possible you are not hearing correctly.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: using "of"

    None of your sentences is correct.

    I'm annoyed about/by what he said to me.
    I felt happy about hearing it.
    I was happy to hear it.
    I'm concerned about you.
    I'm afraid of not understanding the advantages of green energy. (The first "of" was OK.)
    I predict that he will be sacked soon.
    I predict his getting sacked soon.

    (Edit: Cross-posted with BarbD.)
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: using "of"

    I think you might mean "I'm afraid I don't understand the advantages of green energy." This is different from being afraid of not understanding it, which would be a strange thing to be afraid of. In the first sentence, "I'm afraid ..." means something different from your actually being afraid - definition 3 in the first two entries here:
    http://www.thefreedictionary.com/afraid

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    #5

    Re: using "of"

    Thank you for your answers! "I think you might mean "I'm afraid I don't understand the advantages of green energy."".
    In this sentence I refer to the people generally.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: using "of"

    Quote Originally Posted by Tepari View Post
    Thank you for your answers! "I think you might mean "I'm afraid I don't understand the advantages of green energy."".
    In this sentence I refer to the people generally.
    With what word are you referring to people generally? With the word "I"? That isn't possible.

    I'm afraid people don't understand the advantages of green energy.

    I agree with Raymott that it is unlikely that you are actually scared of the possibility that you (or anyone else) don't understand the advantages. My original correction to your sentence was a poor one and I agree that Raymott's is better.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #7

    Re: using "of"

    You could also use I'm afraid the advantages of green energy aren't (widely) understood.

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