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      • Native Language:
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    #1

    promised/promised me

    Can I omit the objective case “me” and say he promised to be on time rather than he promised me to be on time?

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    #2

    Re: promised/promised me

    Yes, you can.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: promised/promised me

    In fact, if the rest of the sentence is "to be on time", then it's better to omit "me".

    He promised to be on time.
    He promised me that he would be on time.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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