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    #1

    What + a(n) + noun

    Hi everyone,

    I'm Quentin, a french student in mechanical engineering (22 years old).
    I was wondering if a "what + a + noun" sentence has always a meaning. I've heard a lot sentences like : "What a jerk !!", "What an Idiot !!" in series or in spoken english. But is there any chance that "What a teacher !" or "What a cat !" or "What a (whatever the noun is)" has a meaning (orally)?


    To place it into a context :

    A friend teaches me a lesson :
    - "...... and now you understand why. "
    I reply :
    -"What a teacher !"

    Is that correct ?
    Does it sound familiar or something ? Must I use those sentences carefully ?

    Thank you for your futur answers !!
    Quentin
    Last edited by GavrocheDesBois; 07-Jul-2014 at 17:49.

  1. SlickVic9000's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: What + a(n) + noun

    (Not a Teacher)

    Statements like that can be interpreted in different ways depending on context:

    What a jerk. = He's quite a jerk. [If it contains an insult, the meaning is usually straightforward]
    What a teacher. = He's an exceptionally (terrible/gifted/strange) teacher. [Meaning is impossible to determine without context]
    What a gentleman. = He's a very (polite/rude) man. ["Rude", in the case of a sarcastic statement]

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: What + a(n) + noun

    If you think that your friend has been a great teacher by teaching you that lesson, then you can say/exclaim "What a teacher!" meaning "What a great teacher you are!"
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: What + a(n) + noun

    I saw a video recently in which a family cat came full speed and hit a dog that was attacking a child. The dog released and ran away. For that "What a cat" would be perfect.

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    #5

    Re: What + a(n) + noun

    Thank you all for your answer !!

    I did see this video in which a cat goes beserker and save a child from a dog. AWESOME !!

    Do those expressions sound familiar ? Or can I use it in every situation (even next to the mother in law ^^)?

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    #6

    Re: What + a(n) + noun

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    I saw a video recently in which a family cat came full speed and hit a dog that was attacking a child. The dog released and ran away. For that "What a cat" would be perfect.
    I saw it, too.
    The cat was very brave, indeed.

  5. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: What + a(n) + noun

    The expressions are normal. I don't know about "every" situation, but in many situations it is fine.

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    #8

    Re: What + a(n) + noun

    So nice to get fast answer.
    I will use that website more often for sure!!
    Have a nice day, all of you

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    #9

    Re: What + a(n) + noun

    How do I put my post to the "solve" status ??

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    #10

    Re: What + a(n) + noun

    We can close the thread if you want us to. Before we stop though, please concentrate on these specific rules of written English:

    - Do not put a space before a comma, full stop, question mark or exclamation mark.
    - A single punctuation mark is sufficient and grammatical. Don't use more than one.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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