Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. Crowned 91's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Italian
      • Home Country:
      • Italy
      • Current Location:
      • Italy

    • Join Date: Apr 2014
    • Posts: 94
    #1

    coward-cowardly

    Hi!

    Most dictionaries classify "coward" as a noun and "cowardly" as an adjective. However, in two dictionaries (Oxford dictionary and Merriam-Webster) I have found that "coward" can also be an adjective.

    All the sentences I have come across use "coward" as a noun. So, is there a situation where I should use coward as an adjective or can I stick to what I have read and always use "coward" as a noun and "cowardly" as an adjective?

    P.S. Is it possible to say both "He is too much of a coward" and "He is too cowardly" to convey the same meaning?

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #2

    Re: coward-cowardly

    The use of 'coward" as an adjective is documented but old. It is not important in modern English.

    Both of your sentences are correct and convey the same meaning.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,912
    #3

    Re: coward-cowardly

    Oxford do say it's literary.

Similar Threads

  1. Coward?
    By TheShadow in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 19-May-2013, 12:37
  2. slightly cowardly
    By tasdibek in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 06-Sep-2006, 20:47

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •