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  1. alikhalili71's Avatar
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    #1

    Voluntary and involuntary action ...?

    Hi there,
    What are the differences between voluntary action and involuntary action in grammar? Please give me some examples.

    Thanks in advance

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    #2

    Re: Voluntary and involuntary action ...?

    There is only one difference: they are opposite in meaning.

    Click here for examples, and then change the headwords to 'involuntary action'.

  2. alikhalili71's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Voluntary and involuntary action ...?

    Thanks for your reply. I know that they are opposite in meaning. I want to know why I can say "This food tastes delicious", but I cannot say "This food is tasting delicious". Is it because "tasting" is an involuntary action?
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 13-Jul-2014 at 08:02. Reason: Deleting unnecessary quote

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Voluntary and involuntary action ...?

    No. The sense of taste is neither voluntary nor involuntary. It is what it is. Some people love broccoli; other don't. The objection to using a continuous verb with a sensing/perceiving verb has been long standing, but that is changing. McDonald's helped spur this change with their "I am loving it" ad. I would not object to your sentence if the person was eating the food at that time.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 13-Jul-2014 at 09:00. Reason: Fixing typo

  4. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Voluntary and involuntary action ...?

    "This food is tasting delicious" is unnatural in most varieties of English. In Indian (South Asian) English, however, it is relatively common.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Voluntary and involuntary action ...?

    Bear in mind that Indian English uses the present continuous much more frequently than most other variants.

    This food tastes delicious - Statement of fact, and "tastes" is almost the same as "is".
    I am eating delicious food - Explanation of what you are currently doing.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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