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  1. Gorkem Atay's Avatar
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    #1

    will

    1. ''You will get your money back''

    I wonder whether you feel the sense of promise of this statement. I want to give a promise meaning to it without using the word ''promise''.


    2. Another thing I want to ask you how I can understand it is a habit of she, I mean, I do not make a sentence which gives a meaning of future, it is just about her habit. How can I understand this is the habit of her, when I saw this sentence.

    ''She will sit and look at the sea''
    Last edited by Gorkem Atay; 14-Jul-2014 at 18:47.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: will

    1. I would accept "You will get your money back" as a promise or a guarantee.

    2. For habitual events, we use the present simple: "She [always/regularly/frequently] sits and looks at the sea".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. Gorkem Atay's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: will

    ''I would accept "You will get your money back" as a promise or a guarantee''.

    What meaning the ''would'' gives in this sentence? I always get in trouble to understand ''would'' meaning. It has lots of function.
    Last edited by Gorkem Atay; 15-Jul-2014 at 15:30.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: will

    If someone wrote it, I would accept it as meaning a guarantee.
    I simply meant "For me, that is the equivalent of a guarantee or a promise".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. Gorkem Atay's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: will

    I think so but, someone said me it does not make any sence using ''would'' alone.

    For example:

    ''I would play football yesterday''

    But you used it alone, may you explain the trick here that I do not know...

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: will

    What do you mean by "using 'would' alone"?

    Your friend is right that "I would play football yesterday" is not grammatical. "Would" suggests possibility or the fact that you are prepared to do something. If you didn't play football yesterday, you can't decide the next day to it.

    If it hadn't been raining, I would have played football yesterday.
    If it weren't raining, I would play football. (present time)
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  7. Gorkem Atay's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: will

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    1. I would accept "You will get your money back" as a promise or a guarantee.

    2. For habitual events, we use the present simple: "She [always/regularly/frequently] sits and looks at the sea".

    I think, in here you used by saying ''I would accept....'' (Probably I am in a mistake but I just want to understand, because this usage of would always make me mad...)

  8. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: will

    Do you understand the construction "If you wrote it, I would accept it"?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  9. Gorkem Atay's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: will

    Of course, this is called 'Type 2 conditional clauses', also the other example you gave is 'type 3' , I know their construction of them. And also I know their meaning...

  10. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: will

    What I wrote is that exact sentence but I chose to leave out "If you wrote it ...".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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