Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. B45
    Guest
    #1

    Can you say: Relieved the midterm is over.

    Can you say: Relieved the midterm is over.

    if someone asks: How are you feeling?

  2. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,103
    #2

    Re: Can you say: Relieved the midterm is over.

    You can say that if the person is likely to understand what you mean. Is it the midterm exam?

  3. B45
    Guest
    #3

    Re: Can you say: Relieved the midterm is over.

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    You can say that if the person is likely to understand what you mean. Is it the midterm exam?
    Yes midterm exam. Shouldn't it be: Relieved that the midterm is over.

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,221
    #4

    Re: Can you say: Relieved the midterm is over.

    If you're going to be so brief, the omission of "that" is not a problem.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  5. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,103
    #5

    Re: Can you say: Relieved the midterm is over.

    Quote Originally Posted by Batman45 View Post
    Yes midterm exam. Shouldn't it be: Relieved that the midterm is over.
    It might be in the US. If you emailed an overseas friend, they might not get it, because it's an exam, or a midterm exam, that you're referring to. You could be talking about a midterm holiday, or you could be relieved that, since the midterm (the middle of the term) is over, most of the term is over.
    There's often an ambiguity when you use an adjective to mean a noun, if you assume that everyone will know which noun you mean. More often than not, such adjectives don't travel well. For example, you might know what a mobile or a cell is, but everyone knows what a phone is.
    So, this might not apply to you, since you're in the US; but it's worth considering when you are posting internationally.

Similar Threads

  1. Ingratitude is relieved with grateful mind
    By keannu in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 27-Apr-2014, 04:54
  2. felt relieved and a sense of
    By navi tasan in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 13-Jul-2013, 19:19
  3. Midterm
    By bid213 in forum Editing & Writing Topics
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 16-Apr-2008, 00:09
  4. "Relieved Off" or "Relieved Of"
    By aqeelas in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-May-2007, 16:23
  5. Release, Relief, Relieved - used in an expression!
    By me_learnEng in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 26-Dec-2006, 16:37

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •