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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    I win vs I won

    Do "I won" and "I win" mean the same? Are both of those used to state someone who's won a game? Does that have anything to do with timing, like "right after the game" or "a while after the game" or "a long time after the game"?

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: I win vs I won

    "Won" is past tense and "win" is present "tense". The verb follows the normal tense rules. Try making two or three sentences using each tense.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: I win vs I won

    But yes, in the seconds after you win, you can say "I win!"

    Five minutes later/20 years later, you must say "I won" when referring to the same contest.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  4. Newbie
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    #4

    Re: I win vs I won

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    "Won" is past tense and "win" is present "tense". The verb follows the normal tense rules. Try making two or three sentences using each tense.
    I know for sure that that is "past" and "present". I'm just confused because I've heard somewhere people say "I win" after the contest/game has finished, so technically the "win action" must be in the past, but still they say "I win".

  5. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: I win vs I won

    As Barb said, if your utterance is closely related in time to the victory, you can use either tense. After that, only the past works. Let's say we are playing cribbage and after I count my hand, I hit 121 points. At that moment I can say "I win". When describing the game later, I would say "I won".

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    #6

    Re: I win vs I won

    Two children are playing dominoes. At the instant that one of them wins, she leaps up to her feet, skips round the room, smiling and singing/shouting "I win, I win, I win. You lose!"

    An adult, hearing the noise, comes into the room, sees that the game is over and says "Who won?" The girl happily shouts "I did" or "I won!" while the other child dejectedly says "She won".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #7

    Re: I win vs I won

    Quote Originally Posted by bakaaki View Post
    I know for sure that that is "past" and "present". I'm just confused because I've heard somewhere people say "I win" after the contest/game has finished, so technically the "win action" must be in the past, but still they say "I win".
    It may technically be in the past, but they are enjoying the moment and using the present helps make it feel that it is their moment of victory now. We can be flexible about time- this is about the joy of winning rather than where the second hand is on the clock.

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