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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    Anglophone use of English language

    English is a rich language with multitude ways to express oneself on a given topic. However, I realise that as a non anglophone, who have never been in a pure anglophone area, that my English is not well appreciated even if I studied it seriously in university and was graduated. What I think is my real problem is that I cannot figure out slang and idiomatic expresssion, which appears to be more authentic for an anglophone than an academic language; for example, it makes sense for me to say, 'payment in advance' instead of 'down-payment'. Actually, I cannot comprehend what sense that 'down' before payment can make; moreover, it sounds like improper. Nonetheless, I guess that it is the best way to be understood by an anglophone. In my Learning of English over the years, theses particularities were never seriously tackled. Please if you understand what I means try say something on it. That will allow, perhaps, allow me to look for other ways to continue my Learning in that language that I love. Also suggesting some books or other means for francophone.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Anglophone use of English language

    Quote Originally Posted by Geovani View Post
    English is a rich language with a multitude of ways/multiple ways to express oneself on a given topic. However, I realise that, as a non-anglophone (no comma required here) who have ​has never been in a pure anglophone area, that my English is not well appreciated great even if though I studied it seriously at university and was graduated.

    What I think is my real problem is that I cannot figure out slang and idiomatic expressions - which they appears appear to be more authentic for an anglophone than an academic language (I don't know what you mean by the underlined part). For example, it makes sense for me to say, 'payment in advance' instead of 'down-payment'. Actually, I cannot comprehend what sense that 'down' before 'payment' can make. Moreover, it sounds like improper (I don't think you meant "improper". It means "rude" or "risqué". Perhaps you meant "incorrect").

    Nonetheless, I guess that it is the best way to be understood by an anglophone. In my learning of English over the years, theses these particularities peculiarities were never seriously tackled. Please, if you understand what I means mean, try to say something on about it. That will allow, perhaps, allow me to look for other ways to continue my learning in that language that I love. Also suggesting please suggest some books or other means resources for a francophone.
    Please see my amendments to your post above in red. Even though you graduated with a degree in English, you seem to make some basic mistakes.

    Note that things like "down payment" (or "downpayment" but not "down-payment") are not slang. They are simply alternative ways of saying things. You don't need to say "downpayment" in order to be understood. We understand "payment in advance" perfectly well.

    I can't say for sure but I think we use "down" in that phrase because, at one time, when someone said they wanted to buy something, they were expected to produce at least some of the money to show that they were serious. It's like a deposit - you put a percentage of the money down on the table and then pay the rest later.

    Cruise price £1100. Put £600 down now and pay the rest in September.
    I've put a deposit down on a house.
    A small downpayment will secure this car.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: Anglophone use of English language

    A "down payment" is a partial payment. If you said "payment in advance" without any other context, I would expect the full payment to be made in advance.

    As for your trouble with slang, do you watch English TV or movies? Since you have the academic background, there is little risk of you picking up bad habits, but you could learn the language as commonly used.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Anglophone use of English language

    The point about "downpayment" and "payment in advance" not being the same thing is something I totally missed in my first reply.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. Newbie
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    #5

    Re: Anglophone use of English language

    Thank you for responding.

    There are two of my mistakes that I do not fully understand : 'at or in university' ;' on something' or 'about something'.

    Actually, I just can't realise what difference an English speaker will make if i say, ' I studied at university or in university'.

    What is the difference between, 'I am talking about something' or 'I speaking on a subject'? They seem to be the same for me.

    Thank you for the explanation about 'downpayment'.

  5. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Anglophone use of English language

    In AmE, it is "at a university" or "in a university". In BrE it is "at university" or "in university" (I think.)

    'I am talking about something' or 'I speaking on a subject'? Those are the same for me.

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Anglophone use of English language

    If you are talking about attending university, BrE uses almost exclusively "at university".

    "I speaking on a subject" is incorrect. The word "am" is missing. With it added, I agree that the two sentences are equivalent.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  7. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Anglophone use of English language

    I missed the missing "am". So much for "copy and paste".

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