Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Armenian
      • Home Country:
      • Armenia
      • Current Location:
      • Armenia

    • Join Date: Apr 2014
    • Posts: 251
    #1

    Could see

    Hi. Have I used the correct tense in this example: "During reading this text 152 passersby could see your add."

  1. tzfujimino's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Dec 2007
    • Posts: 2,697
    #2

    Re: Could see

    Hello, Mher.
    I think your 'During' should be 'While' and 'add' should be 'ad'.
    I'm not really sure if it's the right word to use, but I would use the hyphenated 'passers-by'.
    Are you talking about the possibility or the past event?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Armenian
      • Home Country:
      • Armenia
      • Current Location:
      • Armenia

    • Join Date: Apr 2014
    • Posts: 251
    #3

    Re: Could see

    I am talking about the possibility.

  2. Matthew Wai's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Nov 2013
    • Posts: 7,827
    #4

    Re: Could see

    Then is it correct to say 'could have seen'?
    Last edited by Matthew Wai; 17-Jul-2014 at 06:22.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Armenian
      • Home Country:
      • Armenia
      • Current Location:
      • Armenia

    • Join Date: Apr 2014
    • Posts: 251
    #5

    Re: Could see

    I think no.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,094
    #6

    Re: Could see

    Quote Originally Posted by Mher View Post
    Hi. Have I used the correct tense in this example: "During reading this text 152 passersby could see your add."
    'During' is wrong. 'While' is better, but "While reading this text, 152 passersby could see your ad" means that the 152 passersby could see your ad while they were reading this text."
    How about, "While I was reading this text, 152 passersby could have seen your ad", meaning "in the time I took to read this text ...."
    "could have seen", "might have seen" are correct.
    Also note that ad not add is the abbreviaton for advertisement.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Armenian
      • Home Country:
      • Armenia
      • Current Location:
      • Armenia

    • Join Date: Apr 2014
    • Posts: 251
    #7

    Re: Could see

    I am not talking about a past event. I have established an advertising company and I want to advertise it. What I want to say is that while (in the time) a customer is reading my ad (an advertisement about the services my company offers), certain number of passersby could hypothetically see his banner only if had already made use of my offer.

  4. Matthew Wai's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Nov 2013
    • Posts: 7,827
    #8

    Re: Could see

    'While you (a potential customer) are now reading my ad, 152 passersby could have seen your ad if you had already used my advertising services.'
    Do you mean that?

    Not a teacher.

  5. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,094
    #9

    Re: Could see

    "In the time it takes you to read this text, 152 passers-by could have seen your ad."
    It's conditional. "They could have seen your ad, if you used my services." It's only past in the sense that they've lost time by not subscribing to your service. The message is that they don't have to continue to lose potential customers.

    "In the time it takes you to read this text, 152 passers-by could see your ad." This is present tense, but I don't think it's an improvement.
    "In the time it takes you to read this text, 152 passers-by will be able to see your ad." This is future. I don't think it has the motivating force of the past tense. How do you know what will happen in the future? The customer is more likely to believe that you know the past. You know that, with your service, 152 people could have seen the ad, and didn't. The customer can work out the odds for the future.

    In summary, I think the past tense/conditional version is the best.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,903
    #10

    Re: Could see

    Quote Originally Posted by Mher View Post
    I am not talking about a past event.
    Yes, you are- the person has just read the advert, you are talking about reading it- the fact that the advert is still there doesn't change that. Like Raymott, I prefer the could have read form- the person you're targeting has just read your ad, and their potential customers have missed the chance because you're not displaying your target's ad.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •