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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland

    • Join Date: Feb 2013
    • Posts: 1,509
    #1

    to be keen for somebody to do something

    Hello again!

    The other day, I read in my office English-Polish and Polish-English electronic dictionary that the structure "to be keen for somebody to do something" (meaning "to very much want somebody to do something") exists in English. Is it true or false?

    Thank you.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,091
    #2

    Re: to be keen for somebody to do something

    It's true.

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