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  1. Yonsu99's Avatar
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    #1

    direct in "I direct that I be allowed to die"

    Hello, isn't 'direct' in the following sentence make the sentence sound awkward? I can't explain, but I feel it should be replaced with other word.
    If at such a time the situation should arise in which there is no reasonable expectation of my recovery from extreme physical or mental disability, I direct that I be allowed to die and not be kept alive by medications, artificial means or "heroic measures." I do, however, ask that medication be mercifully administered to me to alleviate suffering even though this may shorten my remaining life.

  2. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: direct in "I direct that I be allowed to die"

    I feel 'request' is better.

    Not a teacher.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: direct in "I direct that I be allowed to die"

    'Direct' is correct, and is probably part of a formula for this sort of statement. If one assumes that one has the right of control over one's destiny in these matters, then 'direct' is more appropriate than 'request'.
    It's like making a will - you don't 'request' that your assets be distributed in a certain way; you 'direct' that they be.
    By making a plain, strong statement like that, medical staff and their lawyers are on firmer ground than they would be if he'd written 'request'.

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: direct in "I direct that I be allowed to die"

    This sounds like a "living will" or part of a "medical power of attorney". In that case, "direct" is correct.

  5. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: direct in "I direct that I be allowed to die"

    I feel that 'request' works better with 'be allowed', am I wrong?

  6. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: direct in "I direct that I be allowed to die"

    In this case, you are wrong. This is about law more than grammar or style.

  7. Raymott's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: direct in "I direct that I be allowed to die"

    "I direct that I request to die" isn't right.
    It's the doctors who have to allow him to die. He is not asking for euthanasia, in which case he might write, "I direct you to terminate my life" or something similar. Different jurisdictions would treat these 'directions' differently. A doctor is not obliged to kill anyone, or even allow them to die just because a patient has written that that is what they want. Often the courts will decide.

  8. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: direct in "I direct that I be allowed to die"

    In this context, 'I direct that I be allowed' is a legal expression different from daily usage, right?
    Normally can I say 'he requested that he be allowed"?

  9. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: direct in "I direct that I be allowed to die"

    I don't believe anybody suggested "I direct that I request to die". I don't even know what that means. I believe Matthew meant "I request that I be allowed to die".

  10. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: direct in "I direct that I be allowed to die"

    Yes, Matthew, you can.

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