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    #1

    secretary to / of / for

    She works as the secretary to the company president.

    I think this "to" is correct. How about "of" or "for" instead of "to"?

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: secretary to / of / for

    I could live with all three, but I prefer, "of".

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    #3

    Re: secretary to / of / for

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    I could live with all three, but I prefer, "of".
    So could I, but I prefer to.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: secretary to / of / for

    I think I prefer "to" as well, but none would sound remarkable.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: secretary to / of / for

    I prefer "to". However, I find the word order slightly unnatural.

    She is the company president's secretary.
    She works as the company president's secretary.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. José Manuel Rosón Bravo's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: secretary to / of / for

    [Not a teacher]

    I know that it is not the case, but I would like to add something about the use of these same prepositions in official job titles.

    Secretary of State
    Secretary of the Commonwealth

    Secretary to the Treasury
    Secretary to the State Government

    Secretary for Development
    Secretary for Justice

    Among others.
    Last edited by José Manuel Rosón Bravo; 21-Jul-2014 at 14:41.
    José Manuel Rosón Bravo

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: secretary to / of / for

    I think your third one should have been either "Secretary to the Treasurer" or "Secretary to the Treasury​".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. José Manuel Rosón Bravo's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: secretary to / of / for

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I think your third one should have been either "Secretary to the Treasurer" or "Secretary to the Treasury​".
    Different regional expressions, because I know for sure that "Secretary to the Treasure" is an usual expression in the United Kingdom, including also other titles, such as Chief Secretary to the Treasure.

    You can see them in these and other news archives:

    https://uk.eurosport.yahoo.com/photo...152350547.html
    http://www.airrailnews.com/index.php...ists/item/1166
    http://www.politics.co.uk/news/2013/...efore-election
    http://www.newsnetscotland.com/index...sible-says-msp
    http://www.ghanaweb.com/GhanaHomePag....php?ID=185908
    José Manuel Rosón Bravo

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    #9

    Re: secretary to / of / for

    It is also interesting to note that Secretary is, like Superintendent, a word that can describe very senior or very junior positions.

    A secretary can be a person who answers the phone, types letters, and does paperwork for you at the office. Or, in the context of a minister but in a republic, a secretary can be someone who is in the top members of cabinet in a government (e.g. Secretary of State).

    Superintendent, at least here in Canada, can be similarly ambiguous. The word can describe the person who is custodian of a school (the janitor or caretaker used to be called the superintendent) or, it can describe someone so senior that Principal Teachers (principals or headmasters) report to them, and are governed by them.

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    #10

    Re: secretary to / of / for

    Sadly, every one of those reports that José Manuel linked to contains a spelling error. It is very easy to mistype "treasury" as "treasure", mainly because ending a word with "ure" is much more common and typists among us frequently make that slip. It could also have been an automatic spellcheck correction, something which frequently actually replaces the correct word with an incorrect word.

    The job title is "[Chief] Secretary to the Treasury". https://www.google.co.uk/webhp?sourc...o+the+treasure
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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