Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. Gorkem Atay's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Turkish
      • Home Country:
      • Turkey
      • Current Location:
      • Turkey

    • Join Date: Jul 2014
    • Posts: 111
    #1

    through

    I want to be sure whether I am correct or not. The ''through'' have lots of meaning but, here I have given two usage of them.
    Are they correct?


    1. She took a walk through the park. (It means roughly, she took a walk from the start of the park to the end of the park.)

    2. The sun came through the window. (It means again roughly, the sun came by means of window.)

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
      • Home Country:
      • Spain
      • Current Location:
      • Spain

    • Join Date: Mar 2006
    • Posts: 290
    #2

    Re: through

    [Not a teacher]

    "She took a walk through the park" = Walking over the total distance, all the way or all the extent of the park; or going in at one side of the park and coming out at the other side of it.

    "The sun came through the window" = Going through. In the same sense that - for instance - to run somebody through with a sword.
    José Manuel Rosón Bravo

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,912
    #3

    Re: through

    I'd say that the first is rougher than the second because of the size.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •