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    #1

    Smile Gerund or present participle?

    Hello!

    I wanted to ask about this because I'm a bit confused. I'm having trouble differentiating sentences such as:

    a) "I don't like him cooking dinner / I don't like his cooking dinner"

    b) "I don't like you calling me lazy / I don't like your calling me lazy"

    I've heard both types (with gerunds or present participle) and I'm not sure whether they're right or wrong. I'm not sure about their differences in meaning either. I want to learn when I can use one or the other.

    Thanks for reading my message

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    #2

    Re: Gerund or present participle?

    Start by reading the Similar Threads below, cookie.

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    #3

    Re: Gerund or present participle?

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    Start by reading the Similar Threads below, cookie.
    Thank you :) that's exactly what I've been doing. I also looked up gerunds, present participle and example sentences on the internet. So, what I'm guessing is that both pair of sentences, a) and b), are right... although,regarding pair a) I'd prefer the present participle. In these specific cases I think both are fine but maybe the gerund (with the possesive pronoun) is a more formal option?

    thanks :)

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Gerund or present participle?

    Quote Originally Posted by cookie201 View Post
    Thank you​. :) That's exactly what I've been doing. I also looked up gerunds, present participle and example sentences on the internet. So, what I'm guessing is that both pairs of sentences, a) and b), are right. although However, regarding pair a) I'd prefer the present participle. In these specific cases I think both are fine but maybe the gerund (with the possessive pronoun) is a more formal option?

    Thanks. :)
    Please note my amendments above. We don't end a sentence with an emoticon - you need to use a punctuation mark. If you wish to use emoticons at all, please click on the icon in the toolbar and pick the appropriate one.

    What you will find is that "I don't like his cooking dinner" and "I don't like your calling me lazy" are the traditionally grammatically correct versions. However, the majority of BrE speakers I know say "I don't like him cooking dinner" and "I don't like you calling me lazy". There are a few people who will insist that the latter sentences are grammatically incorrect. I disagree. They have become grammatically acceptable over several decades.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #5

    Re: Gerund or present participle?

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello, Cookie:

    There are some books that do detect a difference. If (IF!) you believe those books (I do), then here is their explanation:

    1. I do not like your calling me lazy.

    a. You object to the "calling."
    b. It has long been "good" grammar to use the possessive pronoun before the gerund (but, as one moderator reminded us, nowadays most people simply use "you").

    2. I do not like you calling me lazy.

    a. The emphasis is on "you."

    i. That is: How dare YOU call me lazy! YOU are one of the laziest people I know. If someone else had called me lazy, I would not have been so offended! OR: YOU have really hurt my feelings. Yes, I am lazy. But YOU are my mother. A mother should never speak that way to her son.

    *****

    Here is an example from one book:

    3. "I do not approve of that man's coming with Mary." = The coming of the man with Mary is not approved.

    4. "I do not approve of that man coming with Mary." = Disapproval of the man is indicated.




    James


    Source: Homer C. House and Susan Emolyn Harman, Descriptive English Grammar (1950).

    P.S. I agree that most people today would not make such a distinction. They would simply use "you." The context of the conversation would show the actual meaning. Personally, however, I am more comfortable using the possessive: I really liked your posting that question.

  2. tzfujimino's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Gerund or present participle?

    Hello.
    Those '-ing forms' are all gerunds, in my opinion.
    (I wouldn't worry too much about the distinction, though.)
    Last edited by tzfujimino; 23-Jul-2014 at 14:21.

  3. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Gerund or present participle?

    I think it is not a gerund in 'I don't like you calling me lazy'.

    Not a teacher.

  4. tzfujimino's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Gerund or present participle?

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    I think it is not a gerund in 'I don't like you calling me lazy'.

    Not a teacher.
    Hello, Matthew.
    May I ask you why you think so?

  5. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Gerund or present participle?

    Hello, tzfujimino.

    I take 'I don't like the artist singing on stage' to mean 'I don't like the artist who is singing on stage' where 'singing' is the present participle instead of a gerund. Please correct me if I am wrong.

    Not a teacher.

  6. tzfujimino's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Gerund or present participle?

    Thank you for your reply, Matthew. I see.
    Well, in your case, 'singing' can be both, in my opinion. It is a very interesting example sentence.
    In your interpretation, the 'singing on stage' part mostmodifies the noun 'the artist' and therefore it's a present participle. I think it is a valid interpretation. In my interpretation, however, 'singing' is the object of the verb 'like', as in 'I don't like singing on stage'. Hence 'singing' functions as a noun, which means it's a gerund. In my view, a present participle cannot be an object of a verb.

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