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  1. Key Member
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    #1

    avoice

    Hi guys,

    Can we say "Your voice is cutting" over the phone.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: avoice

    No. I don't know what you mean. It is not grammatically correct. What are you trying to say? Is there a reason that you want to say something specifically over the phone?

    Be more careful with your thread titles. The word "avoice" does not exist. I assume you meant to put "A voice". However, that doesn't appear in your thread. A good title would have been "Your voice is cutting".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. lotus888's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: avoice

    Your voice is cutting off over the phone.


    --lotus

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: avoice

    You're cutting in and out.
    I keep losing your signal.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: avoice

    That's interesting that both of you have guessed that tufguy meant "cutting out". I was close to assuming that it meant the speaker had a "cutting voice" - perhaps that it sounded like he/she was always being "cutting" (sort of sarcastic) whenever they spoke.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: avoice

    In AmE, we use "cutting out" a lot for interrupted phone transmission. I don't know why.

  7. Key Member
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    #7

    Re: avoice

    Can we also say "You are going in and out"?

  8. lotus888's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: avoice

    I think it's because you can actually "cut" the telephone line to stop somebody from using the phone. You see that a lot in the old Film Noir type movies.


    --lotus

  9. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: avoice

    At least in American English, we say, "You're cutting out" when a voice on a cell phone becomes garbled, inaudible, or intermittent. That's how I read Emsr's question.

  10. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: avoice

    I haven't asked a question, Charlie! It was tufguy's question. We use "cutting out" in BrE too when the signal gets interrupted and we lose the person on the other end. I wasn't querying the use of "cutting out". I was pointing out that I hadn't associated "Your voice is cutting" with anything to do with the signal. I thought tufguy was actually trying to describe the speaker's voice characteristic.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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