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  1. Gorkem Atay's Avatar
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    #1

    herself

    1. ''She bought a dress for herself.''
    2. ''She bought a dress herself.''

    Although first one's means like roughly, she bought a dress for her; the second one's means like , she bought a dress on her own, she went to the shop alone and bought the dress alone, but it is not clear the dress is for who.

    Am I right?



    Editing version:

    May be the second one should have been like;

    ''She bought a dress by herself'' to give the meaning of 'on her own'.
    Last edited by Gorkem Atay; 26-Jul-2014 at 17:12. Reason: adding word 'by'
    I have no English teacher, I try to improve my language on my own. Thanks for your help.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: herself

    Sometimes there is little difference between "herself" and "by herself."

    Generally "herself" means no one helped her.
    Generally "by herself" means she was alone.

    A child who makes breakfast for mommy might do it "herself" but maybe someone is there watching her.
    A child who makes breakfast "by herself" MIGHT mean this, or might mean "completely alone."

    In the case of the dress, I assume the person went to the store alone and picked out the dress without assistance. There is little difference in meaning.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #3

    Re: herself

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Sometimes there is little difference between "herself" and "by herself."

    Generally "herself" means no one helped her.
    Generally "by herself" means she was alone.

    A child who makes breakfast for mommy might do it "herself" but maybe someone is there watching her.
    A child who makes breakfast "by herself" MIGHT mean this, or might mean "completely alone."

    In the case of the dress, I assume the person went to the store alone and picked out the dress without assistance. There is little difference in meaning.
    quote 'A child who makes breakfast "by herself" MIGHT mean this, or might mean "completely alone."'

    Does it mean that 'The child's parents leave their child home alone'?

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: herself

    No, it does not necessarily mean that.

    A parent may be teaching the child to cook and this was her maiden voyage.
    The parents may be asleep and the child is trying to do something on her own.

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