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  1. B45
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    #1

    I won't be able to train you and hire you for that short period.

    I won't be able to train you and hire you for that short period.

    VS

    I wouldn't be able to train you and hire you fore such short period.

    Are both okay here?

    Helping my company hire an employee.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: I won't be able to train you and hire you for that short period.

    Will the person only be employed for a short period? Is the person only available for a short period?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: I won't be able to train you and hire you for that short period.

    Quote Originally Posted by Batman45 View Post
    I won't be able to train you and hire you for that short a period.
    I wouldn't be able to train you and hire you fore such a short period.
    You should understand the correction of the second sentence. The first one is more difficult. It means "for a period that short".

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: I won't be able to train you and hire you for that short period.

    Note that a sentence that referred to the relationship (not just and) between the two verbs would be much clearer:
    If I hired you ['took you on' would be a more colloquial option] for such a short time I couldn't afford to train you.
    b
    PS This reminds me about a joke about 'CPD' ('Continuing Professional Development'):

    Head teacher: But what if I pay for CPD and then the teachers leave?
    Deputy: But what if you don't pay for CPD and then they don't leave?


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