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  1. B45
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    #1

    It protects your nose, and you can breathe just like if you weren't wearing anything

    It protects your nose, and you can breathe just like if you weren't wearing anything.

    Do you need a comma behind nose?

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: It protects your nose, and you can breathe just like if you weren't wearing anyth

    The comma after "nose" would be common, but I would consider it optional here. It separates two independent clauses, but the first clause is very short. I would delete the "if".

  3. Roman55's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: It protects your nose, and you can breathe just like if you weren't wearing anyth

    I am not a teacher.

    I don't like the 'just like if' at all, and 'just like' is hardly better.

    I would replace that with 'as though' or 'as if'.

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