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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    Word order: "tastes even too perverse"

    My question is in regard to the word order in the following sentence:

    Now, it was that arrogance, but peppered with the look Dru’s own race reserved for those Vraad with tastes even too perverse for their brethren to accept.
    *boldfaced the relevant fragment

    It somehow doesn't sound right. I would rewrite it like this:
    Now, it was that arrogance, but peppered with the look Dru’s own race reserved for those Vraad with tastes too perverse even for their brethren to accept.
    So I moved the word "even" after "to perverse" instead of before it.
    The sentence is from a novel by a well known writer, R. A. Knaak.

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    #2

    Re: Word order: "tastes even too perverse"

    Your rewrite is an improvement on the original.

  2. Newbie
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    #3

    Re: Word order: "tastes even too perverse"

    ...is an improvement...
    Does that mean that the original is nonetheless grammatically correct?


    I'm wondering if it could be intentional (the author deliberately put it in that order) or is it necessarily a mistake / omission on his part?

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Word order: "tastes even too perverse"

    I think it was intentional. For me, it's "... with tastes [which were] even too perverse ...". I don't have a problem with that grammatically.

    Could you eat a kilo of chips?
    No, that's even too much for me.
    No, that's too much even for me.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. Newbie
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    #5

    Re: Word order: "tastes even too perverse"

    That's fascinating.

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Could you eat a kilo of chips?
    No, that's even too much for me.
    No, that's too much even for me.
    That intrigues me. Your example still sounds awkward to me. I can't quite grasp the meaning when the sentence is in that order. It also makes me wonder why would someone write / speak like this (instead of using the more 'conventional' sequence)?

    I've researched it a little and it seems that it's, surprisingly to me, quite common. Some examples (once again, I'm not sure that all the examples convey the same meaning):
    This was in a movie where Hugh Jackman had testicles hanging from his chin? “Yes, it was even too much for that.” - source
    The proposed German rulebook is even too much for one state, Schleswig Holstein, which has opted out and passed its own EU-compliant rules – a move likely to see foreign operators apply for a licence there. - source
    In subsequent weeks he shared a cell with Wilhelm Boger, a Hauptsturmführer of the SS who was imprisoned for atrocities that according to Diamanski, were "even too much for the SS" at the time. - source
    Sometimes it’s even too much for the people paid to make these claims. - source
    Snow even too much for Willie the groundhog - source
    I'm wondering if putting it in that order might change the meaning of it slightly?

    I guess I'll just have to live with that feeling of awkwardness whenever I see that construction and given enough time (and examples) hope that one day it will start to feel natural.

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