Results 1 to 9 of 9
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Jul 2014
    • Posts: 3
    #1

    Reductions

    Hi
    I've written a sentence using "reductions"; I'm wondering whether it's right:

    "Returning home from work, entirely fatigued, one finds home a safe haven of peace and tranquility in which alongside his or her family they can soothe their mind and nerves."

    What I wanna know is that using ", entirely fatigued," after "returning home from work" in a reduction form like that is right or not.
    I would appreciate your help.

  1. Odessa Dawn's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Saudi Arabia
      • Current Location:
      • Saudi Arabia

    • Join Date: Aug 2012
    • Posts: 1,616
    #2

    Re: Reductions

    ***NOT A TEACHER***
    Quote Originally Posted by MeysamAman View Post
    What I wanna want to know is that using ", entirely fatigued," after "returning home from work" in a reduction form like that is right or not.
    Already answered here.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 6,332
    #3

    Re: Reductions

    [QUOTE=MeysamAman;1085407]Hi
    I've written a sentence using "reductions"; I'm wondering whether it's right:





    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello, MeysamAman:

    I want to congratulate you on working so hard to write a sentence.

    I think that the answer to your question is YES.

    That is, it is, I believe, correct to use "entirely fatigued" after "Returning home from work."

    Let me see if I can make up a similar sentence:

    "Waking up at 7 a.m., entirely refreshed, I was ready to face a new day."

    *****

    May I most respectfully suggest a few little changes to your very nice sentence?

    Maybe something like:

    "Returning home from work, entirely fatigued, one finds a safe haven of peace and prosperity where one can soothe both the mind and nerves in the company of one's family."


    P.S. When you use "one," it sounds a little formal and distant. Perhaps some people might want to change "one" to "you" and change "one's" to "your." And, of course, "one finds" becomes "you find." You could also say: "Returning home from work, entirely fatigued, a person finds a safe haven of peace and prosperity where they can soothe both the mind and nerves in the company of their family." (In 2014, many native speakers now use "they" and "their" to refer one person. Most speakers no longer use "he" and "his" in such a sentence.)



    James

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Jul 2014
    • Posts: 3
    #4

    Re: Reductions

    james, I'm really grateful for your broad, thorough, and very useful reply. I used your apposite remarks, and replaced my words with your suggestions. Thanks again
    MeysamAman
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 01-Aug-2014 at 07:33. Reason: Removed unnecessary quote

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,818
    #5

    Re: Reductions

    As OdessaDawn pointed out (and linked to), your question had already been comprehensively answered on another forum. Whilst you can, of course, post in two different forums, it is polite to let us know if your question has already been answered. Is there a reason you came here for more opinions? Did you have a problem with the information given to you over at EnglishForums?

    In addition, there is no need to write a new post to say "Thank you" and no need to quote entire answers back at us. Simply click on the "Thank" button in the bottom left-hand corner or any post you find helpful.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Jul 2014
    • Posts: 3
    #6

    Re: Reductions

    hi, "emsr2d2"
    let me explain: 1- I'm really sorry for being inconvenient, I'm new here 2- I didn't get any answer even close to what I meant, there in EnglishForums, let alone been "comprehensively" answered!! 3- I didn't see any, actually there wasn't any, such "thank" or otherwise button you are talking about 4- there is only one option to reply, "reply with quote", I don't know how to reply otherwise; please help me on that.
    Last edited by Barb_D; 01-Aug-2014 at 13:55. Reason: removed quote

  3. Matthew Wai's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Nov 2013
    • Posts: 7,799
    #7

    Re: Reductions

    Quote Originally Posted by MeysamAman View Post
    .. sorry for being inconvenient ...
    People usually say 'sorry for the inconvenience caused'.

    Not a teacher.

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,215
    #8

    Re: Reductions

    Hi MeysamAman,

    It takes a little bit of time to learn how a forum works. Don't worry.

    The "thank" button is under the post you are reading on the left. There is one for "like" (I agree) and one for "thank" (thank you for this answer).

    You should see some buttons under the post on the right. There is one for "reply" and one for "reply with quote." Use the quote only when necessary. It makes the pages very long!

    Thanks and welcome.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  5. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,215
    #9

    Re: Reductions

    I don't see it as "reduced." It is simply an phrase that describes the person as they return home.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

Similar Threads

  1. [Grammar] reductions v.s. reduction
    By savemyenglish in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 26-Mar-2012, 11:34
  2. [Grammar] reductions in / of
    By CaseyA in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-Aug-2011, 05:46

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •