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  1. englishhobby's Avatar
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    #1

    He gets back in a week.

    As far as I know, the present simple tense is used with timetables only (to speak about future actions).
    So we need the present continuous here, don't we? Or not necessarily?
    Which is miore natural? Are both possible?
    1) He gets back in a week.
    2)He is getting back in a week.
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up. :-)

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: He gets back in a week.

    #1 is more natural for me.

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: He gets back in a week.

    The present simple has more uses than that.

  4. englishhobby's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: He gets back in a week.

    What's the difference then (in grammar) between:
    1) He is coming tomorrow.
    2) He gets back in a week.

    I feel we can't say "He comes back tomorrow" and (as you said) we'd better not say "He is getting back in a week". Why?
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up. :-)

  5. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: He gets back in a week.

    I didn't say that you can't use "He's getting back in a week". I said that "He gets back in a week" is more natural in my opinion.

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: He gets back in a week.

    I would use "He gets back in a week", "He'll be back in a week" or "He's due back in a week". I find "He's getting back in a week" less natural, like bhaisahab.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  7. englishhobby's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: He gets back in a week.

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I would use "He gets back in a week", "He'll be back in a week" or "He's due back in a week". I find "He's getting back in a week" less natural, like bhaisahab.
    I'm still wondering why we use the present continuous in "He's coming back in a week" (and not "He comes back in a week") and the present simple in "He gets back in a week" . Is there some explanation or is it just something a learner should take as it is?
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up. :-)

  8. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: He gets back in a week.

    Quote Originally Posted by englishhobby View Post
    What's the difference then (in grammar) between:
    1) He is coming tomorrow.
    2) He gets back in a week.

    Six days!

    I feel we can't say "He comes back tomorrow."

    Sure we can! Why not? It means the same thing as "He gets back tomorrow." We can also say "He flies back tomorrow" or "He drives back tomorrow." They're all informal but correct conversational English.

    And (as you said) we'd better not say "He is getting back in a week." Why?

    It's fine. Or, more naturally: "He's getting back in a week."
    I think Bhalsahab speaks British English. I speak U.S. American. That might be why our responses are slightly different.

  9. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: He gets back in a week.

    I don't have a problem with "He comes back tomorrow".

  10. englishhobby's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: He gets back in a week.

    Is grammar changing then?
    In Michael Swan's Grammar I have found this:
    "In other cases (besides timetables and schedules, instructions and subordinate clauses - my comment) we do not usually use the simple present to talk about the future. Lucy's coming for a drink this evening. (NOT Lucy comes...)"

    Of course, native speakers know how to speak their language , but what shall I do with my students? Shall I say to them that the grammar book is wrong, or that it used to be right before, but now there are new tendencies not fixed in grammar or something else?

    The problem is that I need to present new grammar to my students, then make up (or find) exercises for them to practice, then they produce their own sentences when speaking, then I should make a test for them to check their progress... Should I include this case with "He gets back in a week" if it's not in grammar books, but native speakers are using it?
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up. :-)

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