Results 1 to 5 of 5
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Armenian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 2,450
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    all

    Are these sentences correct:

    1-That may happen to all of us.
    2-That may happen to every one of us.
    3-That may happen to each of us.
    (Do they all mean the same?)

    4-All of us may have to face something like that.
    5-Every one of us may have to face something like that.
    6-Each of us may have to fact something like that.
    (Do they all mean the same?)


    • Join Date: Jan 2006
    • Posts: 137
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: all

    Navi Tasan,

    I guess that the first 3 sentences do have the same meaning. But when you use "every one of us" and "each of us" it sounds more powerful, it is stronger so it has more impact. But on the whole, they mean the same.

    The same when it comes to your second selection of sentences, although that I'm not familiar with the verb "to fact". I can't say that I have heard it before, but I'm not saying that it is wrong It's probably lack of knowledge


    Kind Regards

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Feb 2005
    • Posts: 2,585
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: all

    Hello Navi

    Each set of three has the same implication. But the focus is slightly different in each. "All" focuses on the group ("us") as a whole. "Each" and "every" focus on the individual members of the group. (Perhaps "every" has more of a sense of focusing "one by one".)

    MrP

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Armenian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 2,450
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: all

    Thank you Mr. Pedantic,
    So can:
    'That may happen to all of us.'
    mean:
    a-It is possible for each of us to have that happen to them.
    (Here we aren't necessarily talking about one single event that would affect us all at the same time)
    and:
    b-It is possible for that to happen to all of us together and at the same time.
    To me, it seems that 'all' and 'every one ' are ambiguous in these sentences, because they could mean 'each one of us seperately and not all of us together as a group', and they could also mean 'all of us together'.
    -John had an accident.
    -That may happen to all of us. (seperately, singly)
    -There's a storm and our boat may sink.
    -My God. All of us/every one us may die. (together)
    [I am not sure one can say 'each' here]
    Last edited by navi tasan; 17-Apr-2006 at 03:31.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Feb 2005
    • Posts: 2,585
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #5

    Re: all

    Hello Navi

    Yes, you're right: "That may happen to all of us" is ambiguous. (Though context will make it clear, if it means one event which may affect each member of the group simultaneously!)

    As for "All of us/every one of us may die", I'd agree: "each of us may die", though possible, would tend to suggest separate individual deaths, rather than simultaneous deaths. (Though who knows what we'd say, in such a situation probably grammar would be the last thing on our minds.)

    See you,
    MrP

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •