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  1. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #1

    Transitional event verbs followed by a period of time

    This page says that such verbs as 'die' and 'stop' are transitional event verbs, so it is incorrect to say 'He has died for two years'.
    But on wordreference, someone told me that 'The campaign has stopped for a long time' was correct.
    Why is 'has died for two years' incorrect but 'has stopped for a long time' correct?

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Transitional event verbs followed by a period of time

    "He has died for two years" is completely incorrect. You can either say "He has died" or "He died two years ago".

    "The campaign has stopped for a long time" doesn't work for me either. A campaign is either ongoing or it has stopped. You can say "The campaign has stopped" or "The campaign has been stopped" but to include a time reference, I would say "The campaign stopped/was stopped a long time ago".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Transitional event verbs followed by a period of time

    'For the moment the rain had stopped'── quoted from http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/moment
    Is 'for the moment' a time reference?

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Transitional event verbs followed by a period of time

    No. It doesn't tell you when it stopped. It just tells you that it is currently not raining.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Transitional event verbs followed by a period of time

    'After vomiting has stopped for 1 hour, sip a rehydration drink to restore lost fluids and nutrients.'── quoted from http://fraze.it/n_search.jsp?q=%22ha...2&l=0&sugg=off
    Should it be rewritten as 'An hour after vomiting has stopped, ...'

    Do you think all examples of 'has stopped for weeks' below are incorrect?
    https://www.google.com/webhp?sourcei...d+for+weeks%22

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